Weather synopsis

An abbreviated synopsis is provided for the final Weekly Update of the 2020 growing season. It was a warm week for most of the prairies! The highest temperatures the past seven days across the prairies are represented in Figure 1 and ranged from <22 to >35 °C.

Figure 1. Highest temperatures (°C) observed across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (April 1-August 19, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (20Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

All those high temperatures advanced the accumulation of heat units across the prairies. The growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5 ºC, April 1-August 17, 2020) is below (Fig. 2) while the growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10 ºC, April 1-August 17, 2020) is shown in Figure 3.

Figure 2. Growing degree day map (Base 5 °C) observed across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-August 17, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (20Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209
Figure 3. Growing degree day map (Base 10 °C) observed across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-August 17, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (20Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

So far this growing season, the number of days above 25 °C ranges from 0-10 days in the northwest of the prairies then increases up to 61-70 days in southern Manitoba (Fig. 4). In comparison, the number of days above 30 °C ranges up to 25-27 days in southern Saskatchewan and southern Manitoba (Fig. 5)

Figure 4. Number of days above 25 °C observed across the Canadian prairies this growing season (April 1-August 19, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (20Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209
Figure 5. Number of days above 30 °C observed across the Canadian prairies this growing season (April 1-August 19, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (20Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

As fields continue to mature in late August and in to September, growers will be watching for cool evenings. The lowest temperatures the past seven days across the prairies are represented in Figure 6 and ranged from <1 to >13 °C.

Figure 6. Lowest temperatures (°C) observed across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (April 1-August 19, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (20Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

Cumulative rainfall for the past 7 days was lowest across central and southern regions of Alberta and Saskatchewan while western and northern areas of the Peace River region AND eastern Saskatchewan plus much of Manitoba received more moisture (Fig. 7). Cumulative 30-day (Fig. 8) and rainfall for the growing season (April 1-August 19, 2020; Fig. 9) are below.

Figure 7. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (as of August 19, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (20Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209
Figure 8. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past 30 days (as of August 19, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (20Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209
Figure 9. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (as of August 19, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (20Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. Growers can bookmark the AAFC Current Conditions Drought Watch Maps for the growing season. Historical weather data can be access at the AAFC Drought Watch website, Environment Canada’s Historical Data website, or your provincial weather network.

Weather synopsis

This past week (Aug 4-10, 2020) conditions were generally warm and dry. Weekly prairie temperatures were warmest across Manitoba and Saskatchewan (Fig. 1). Lower temperatures were observed across western and northwestern Alberta (Fig. 1). Though average 30-day (July 12 – August 10, 2020) temperatures continue to be cooler in Alberta than eastern Saskatchewan and Manitoba (Fig. 2), temperature anomalies (mean temperature difference from average; July 14-August 10, 2020) indicate that conditions have generally been warmer than average across most of Alberta as well as Parkland regions of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (Fig. 3).

Figure 1. Observed average temperatures across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (August 4-10, 2020).
Figure 2. Observed average temperatures across the Canadian prairies the past 30 days (July 12-August 10, 2020).
Figure 3. Mean temperature difference from Normal the past 30 days (July 14-August 12, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (12Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

Regions in southeastern central and southern Saskatchewan and across southern Manitoba have reported temperatures that have been up to 2 °C cooler than average. Based on growing season temperatures (April 1-August 10, 2020) temperatures were warmest across the southern prairies (Fig. 4). Based on growing season temperature deviations (observed temperatures compared with climate normal temperatures), below average temperatures have been observed across central and western regions of Saskatchewan and central regions of Alberta (Fig. 5). Across southern Alberta and most of Manitoba, temperatures have generally been above average. (Fig. 5)

Figure 4. Observed average temperatures across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-August 10, 2020).
Figure 5. Observed difference from average temperatures across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-August 10, 2020).

Most areas reported 7-day cumulative rainfall amounts that were less than 10 mm (Fig. 6). Cumulative 30-day rainfall was lowest across a large area ranging across southern Alberta as well as central and western regions of Saskatchewan (Fig. 7). Growing season rainfall (percent of average) is highly variable across the prairies (Fig. 8). Rainfall has been below normal across most of Saskatchewan as well as southern Alberta, and the Peace River region (Fig. 8).

Figure 6. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (August 4-10, 2020).
Figure 7. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past 30 days (July 12-August 10, 2020).
Figure 8. Percent of average precipitation for the growing season (April 1-August 10, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (12Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5 ºC, April 1-August 9, 2020) is below (Fig. 9) while the growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10 ºC, April 1-August 9, 2020) is shown in Figure 10.

Figure 9. Growing degree day map (Base 5 °C) observed across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-August 9, 2020).
Figure 10. Growing degree day map (Base 10 °C) observed across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-August 9, 2020).

The highest temperatures (°C) observed across the Canadian prairies the past seven days ranged from <17 to >34 °C (Fig. 11) while the lowest temperatures ranged from <-1 to >13 °C (Fig. 12). So far this growing season (as of August 12, 2020), the number of days above 25 °C ranges from 0-10 days in the west (to west of Calgary, west and north of central Alberta and extending into the south and west of the Peace River region) but extends up to 51-60 days in southern Manitoba (Fig. 13).

Figure 11. Highest temperatures (°C) observed across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (April 1-August 12, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (13Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209
Figure 12. Lowest temperatures (°C) observed across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (April 1-August 12, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (13Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209
Figure 13. Number of days above 25 °C observed across the Canadian prairies this growing season (April 1-August 12, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (13Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. Growers can bookmark the AAFC Current Conditions Drought Watch Maps for the growing season. Historical weather data can be access at the AAFC Drought Watch website, Environment Canada’s Historical Data website, or your provincial weather network.

Weather synopsis

This past week (July 28 to August 3, 2020) prairie temperatures were warmest in southeastern Alberta and southwestern Saskatchewan and coolest in southern Manitoba and the Peace River region of Alberta and British Columbia (Fig. 1). Temperatures in the past week represent a switch from previous weeks, where it was warmer in Manitoba than in Alberta. Average 30-day temperatures (July 5 to August 3, 2020) continue to be cooler across most of Alberta than observed in eastern Saskatchewan and Manitoba (Fig. 2). The average 30-day temperature at Winnipeg and Brandon continued to be greater than locations in Alberta and Saskatchewan (Fig. 2).

Figure 1. Observed average temperatures across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (July 28-August 3, 2020).
Figure 2. Observed average temperatures across the Canadian prairies the past 30 days (July 5-August 3, 2020).
Figure 3. Mean temperature difference from Normal the past 30 days (July 1-31, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (13Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

Cumulative rainfall for the past 7 days was lowest across southern regions of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba (Fig. 4). Cumulative 30-day rainfall was lowest across a large area ranging from southwest Saskatchewan to Saskatoon (Fig. 5). Growing season rainfall (percent of average) is below normal across eastern Saskatchewan and localized areas of Manitoba and above normal across most of Alberta (Fig. 6).

Figure 4. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (July 28-August 5, 2020).
Figure 5. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past 30 days (July 5-August 3, 2020).
Figure 6. Percent of average precipitation for the growing season (April 1-August 3, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (04Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5 ºC, April 1-August 3, 2020) is below (Fig. 7) while the growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10 ºC, April 1-August 3, 2020) is shown in Figure 8.

Figure 7. Growing degree day map (Base 5 °C) observed across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-August 3, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (06Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209
Figure 8. Growing degree day map (Base 10 °C) observed across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-August 3, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (06Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The highest temperatures (°C) observed across the Canadian prairies the past seven days ranged from <24 to >32 °C (Fig. 9). So far this growing season (as of August 6, 2020), the number of days above 25°C ranges from 0-10 days throughout much of Alberta and into the BC Peace then extends up to 51-60 days in southern Manitoba (Fig. 10).

Figure 9. Highest temperatures (°C) observed across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (April 1-August 3, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (06Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209
Figure 10. Number of days above 25 °C observed across the Canadian prairies this growing season (April 1-August 5, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (06Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. Growers can bookmark the AAFC Current Conditions Drought Watch Maps for the growing season. Historical weather data can be access at the AAFC Drought Watch website, Environment Canada’s Historical Data website, or your provincial weather network.

Weather synopsis

An abbreviated synopsis of the past week is provided below. Recent warm weather across the Canadian prairies helped crop development this past week

The growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5 ºC, April 1-July 27, 2020) is below (Fig. 1) while the growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10 ºC, April 1-July 27, 2020) is shown in Figure 2.

Figure 1. Growing degree day map (Base 5 °C) observed across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-July 27, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (30Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209
Figure 2. Growing degree day map (Base 10 °C) observed across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-July 27, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (30Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The highest temperatures (°C) observed across the Canadian prairies the past seven days ranged from <22 to >34 °C (Fig. 3). So far this growing season (up to July 29, 2020), the number of days above 25 ranges from 0-10 days throughout much of Alberta and into the BC Peace then extends up to 41-50 days in southern Manitoba (Fig. 4).

Figure 3. Highest temperatures (°C) observed across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (April 1-July 29, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (30Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209
Figure 4. Number of days above 25 °C observed across the Canadian prairies this growing season (April 1-July 29, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (30Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

Cumulative rainfall for the past 7 days was lowest across southern regions of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba with the exception of around Regina south to the American border, and southwest Manitoba west into the southeast corner of Saskatchewan (Fig. 5). Cumulative 30-day (Fig. 6) and rainfall for the growing season (April 1-July 29, 2020; Fig. 7) are below.

Figure 5. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (as of July 29, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (30Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209
Figure 6. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past 30 days (as of July 29, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (30Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209
Figure 7. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (as of July 29, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (30Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. Growers can bookmark the AAFC Current Conditions Drought Watch Maps for the growing season. Historical weather data can be access at the AAFC Drought Watch website, Environment Canada’s Historical Data website, or your provincial weather network.

Weather synopsis

This past week (July 13-19, 2020) prairie temperatures were warmest in Manitoba and eastern Saskatchewan (Table 1; Fig. 1). Average 7-day temperatures continue to be warmest across Manitoba and eastern Saskatchewan and coolest across most of Alberta(Table 1; Fig. 1).

Figure 1. Observed average temperatures across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (July 13-19, 2020).

Average 30-day (June 20-July 19, 2020) temperatures continued to be cooler in Alberta than eastern Saskatchewan and Manitoba (Table 2; Fig. 2). The average 30-day temperature at Winnipeg and Brandon continued to be greater than locations in Alberta and Saskatchewan(Table 2; Fig. 2). Based on growing season temperatures (April 1 – July 19, 2020), conditions continue to be warmest for southern locations (Table 3).

Figure 2. Observed average temperatures across the Canadian prairies the past 30 days (June 20-July 19, 2020).

Cumulative rainfall for the past 7 days was lowest across southern regions of Alberta and Saskatchewan. Cumulative 30-day rainfall was lowest across a large area ranging from southwest Saskatchewan to Saskatoon. Growing season rainfall (percent of average) is below normal across eastern Saskatchewan and localized areas of Manitoba.

Figure 4. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (July 16-19, 2020).
Figure 5. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past 30 days (June 20-July 19, 2020).
Figure 6. Percent of average precipitation for the growing season (April 1-July 19, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (21Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5 ºC, April 1-July 13, 2020) is below (Fig. 7) while the growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10 ºC, April 1-July 13, 2020) is shown in Figure 8.

Figure 7. Growing degree day map (Base 5 °C) observed across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-July 22, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (23Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209
Figure 8. Growing degree day map (Base 10 °C) observed across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-July 22, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (23Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The highest temperatures (°C) observed across the Canadian prairies the past seven days ranged from <19 to >32 °C (Fig. 9). So far this growing season (up to July 22, 2020), the number of days above 25 ranges from 0-10 days throughout much of Alberta and into the BC Peace then extends up to 41-50 days in southern Manitoba (Fig. 10).

Figure 9. Highest temperatures (°C) observed across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (April 1-July 19, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (23Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209
Figure 10. Number of days above 25 °C observed across the Canadian prairies this growing season (April 1-July 22, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (23Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. Growers can bookmark the AAFC Current Conditions Drought Watch Maps for the growing season. Historical weather data can be access at the AAFC Drought Watch website, Environment Canada’s Historical Data website, or your provincial weather network.

Weather synopsis

The 2020 growing season, April 1 – July 12, 2020, has been cooler and wetter than normal across many locations in Alberta and Saskatchewan. Conditions in Manitoba have been warmer and dryer than normal. This past week (July 6-12, 2020) prairie temperatures were warmest in Manitoba and eastern Saskatchewan (Table 1; Fig. 1). Average 7-day temperatures continue to be warmest across Manitoba and eastern Saskatchewan and coolest across most of Alberta (Table 1; Fig. 1).

Figure 1. Observed average temperatures across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (July 6-12, 2020).

Average 30-day (June 13-July 12, 2020) temperatures continue to be cooler in Alberta than in southern Saskatchewan and Manitoba (Table 2; Fig. 2). The average 30-day temperature at Winnipeg and Brandon continued to be greater than locations in Alberta and Saskatchewan (Fig. 2). Temperature anomalies indicate that temperatures have been below normal across most of Alberta and Saskatchewan and were 0 to 2 °C warmer than average across eastern Saskatchewan and southern Manitoba (Table 2; Fig. 3). Based on growing season temperatures (April 1 – July 12, 2020), conditions have been warmest for southern locations (Table 3).

Figure 2. Observed average temperatures across the Canadian prairies the past 30 days (June 13-July 12, 2020).
Figure 3. Mean temperature difference from Normal the past 30 days (June 16-July 13, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (13Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

Cumulative rainfall for the past 7 days was lowest across southern regions of Alberta and across most of Manitoba (Table 1 Fig. 4). Lethbridge reported 4.2 mm and Winnipeg reported 1.4 mm (Table 1). Cumulative 30 day rainfall continued to be greatest across central regions of Alberta (Table 2; Fig. 5). Rainfall amounts were lowest across southern regions of the prairies (Table 2; Fig. 5).

Figure 4. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (July 6-12, 2020).

Total 30-day rainfall at Brandon, Winnipeg and Swift Current was less than 100 mm (Table 2; Fig. 5). Lethbridge has reported 122.3 mm (261% of normal) in the past 30 days (Table 2). Growing season rainfall (percent of average) is below normal across eastern Saskatchewan and localized areas of Manitoba.

Figure 5. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past 30 days (June 13-July 12, 2020).
Figure 6. Percent of average precipitation for the growing season (April 1-July 13, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (14Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5 ºC, April 1-July 13, 2020) is below (Fig. 7):

Figure 7. Growing degree day map (Base 5 °C) observed across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-July 13, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (16Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10 ºC, April 1-July 13, 2020) is below (Fig. 8):

Figure 8. Growing degree day map (Base 10 °C) observed across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-July 13, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (16Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The highest temperatures (°C) observed the past seven days ranged from <15 to >33 °C in the map below (Fig. 9).

Figure 9. Highest temperatures (°C) observed across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (April 1-July 13, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (16Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. Growers can bookmark the AAFC Current Conditions Drought Watch Maps for the growing season. Historical weather data can be access at the AAFC Drought Watch website, Environment Canada’s Historical Data website, or your provincial weather network.

Weather Synopsis

Weather synopsis – Temperature – Crops continue to mature and some fields have been harvested across the prairies.  The map below reflects the number of days above 25°C (Fig. 1) while the next map reflects the number of days above 30°C (Fig. 2).

Figure 1. Number of days above 25°C.
Figure 2. Number of days above 30°C.



The map below reflects the highest temperatures across the prairies the past seven days (Fig. 3) while the lowest temperatures the past seven days reveals some cool nights in some areas (Fig. 4).

Figure 3.  Highest temperatures the past seven days (August  15-21, 2017) across
the Canadian prairies.

Figure 4. Lowest temperatures the past seven days (August  15-21, 2017) across
the Canadian prairies.


Precipitation – Seven-day rainfall accumulations were greatest in central Alberta into Saskatchewan but also in eastern Saskatchewan and into Manitoba (Fig. 5). 

Figure 5. Accumulated precipitation the past seven days (August 15-21, 2017).

The accumulated precipitation for the growing season (Fig. 6) continues to reflect dryer growing conditions and dryer than normal for most of the prairies (Fig. 7). 

Figure 6. Accumulated precipitation for the growing season (April 1-21, 2017).
Figure 7. Percent of average precipitation for the growing season (April 1-August 21, 2017).





The growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10ºC, March 1 – August 20, 2017) is below:



The growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5ºC, March 1 – August 20, 2017) is below:





The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.  Growers may wish to bookmark the AAFC Drought Watch Maps for the growing season.

Weekly Update – Weather Synopsis

Weather synopsis – Temperature – This week’s temperatures were warmest in southern Alberta and Manitoba (Fig. 1). The 30-day average temperatures were warmest along the border with USA (Fig. 2).

Figure 1. Average precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past
seven days (August 7-14, 2017).



Figure 2.  Average temperature across the Canadian prairies the
past 30 days (July 14-August 14, 2017).





After a fair bit heat across the prairies (Fig. 3), a few of us woke to cooler temperatures (Fig. 4) this week!

Figure 3.  Highest temperatures the past seven days (August  10-16, 2017) across
the Canadian prairies.
Figure 4.  Lowest temperatures the past seven days (August  10-16, 2017) across
the Canadian prairies.



Precipitation – Seven-day rainfall accumulations were greatest in regions north of the Yellowhead highway (Fig. 5). Total 30-day rainfall accumulations indicate that conditions dryer than normal for most of the prairies, particularly southern and central regions of Alberta (Fig. 6). 

Figure 5. Accumulated precipitation the past seven days (August 7-13, 2017).



Figure 6. Percent of average precipitation across the Canadian prairies the 
past 30 days (July 15-August 13, 2017). 



This growing season (April 1 – August 13, 2017), the percent of average precipitation continues to be below average for most of the prairies (Fig. 7).

Figure 7. Percent of average precipitation across the Canadian prairies for the 
growing season (April 1-August 13, 2017). 






The growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10ºC, March 1 – August 13, 2017) is below:






The growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5ºC, March 1 – August 13, 2017) is below:







The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.  Growers may wish to bookmark the AAFC Drought Watch Maps for the growing season.

Weekly Update – Weather Synopsis

Weather synopsis – This past week’s temperatures were above normal in many locations on the prairies, especially south and central Alberta and Saskatchewan (Fig. 1).  

Figure 1. Highest temperatures across the Canadian prairies the 
past seven days (July 25-31, 2017).



Seven-day rainfall accumulations were low across the prairies. Total 30-day rainfall accumulations indicate that conditions are normal to dryer-than-normal for most of the prairies (Fig. 2). 

Figure 2.  Percent of average precipitation across the Canadian prairies the 
past 30 days (July 2-31, 2017). 



Growing season (April 1 – July 31, 2017) percent of average precipitation continues to be average for some areas of Alberta, but below average for most of Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

Figure 3.  Percent of average precipitation across the Canadian prairies over 
the growing season (April 1-July 31, 2017).




The growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10ºC, March 1 – July 30, 2017) is below:








The growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5ºC, March 1 – July 30, 2017) is below:







The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.  Growers may wish to bookmark the AAFC Drought Watch Maps for the growing season.

Weekly Update – Weather Synopsis

Weather synopsis – This week’s temperatures were similar to last week, both the seven-day (Fig. 1) and 30-day average temperatures (Fig. 2) were similar to long term averages (Fig. 3). Compared to 30-day average temperatures, Alberta was above normal, whereas Saskatchewan and Manitoba were slightly below normal (Fig. 2).

Figure 1.  Accumulated precipitation the past  7 days (from July 17-24, 2017) across the Canadian prairies.


Figure 2.  Accumulated precipitation the past 30 days (from June 24-July 24, 2017) across the Canadian prairies.


Figure 3.  Long Term Normal (LTN) average temperatures over 30 days
 (from June 24-July 24) across the Canadian prairies.





Seven-day rainfall accumulations were low across the prairies ( Fig. 4). Total 30-day rainfall accumulations indicate that conditions are normal to dryer than normal for most of the prairies (Fig. 5). Growing season (April 1 – July 23, 2017) percent of average precipitation continues to be average for most of Alberta and below average for most of Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

Figure 4. Accumulated precipitation the past seven days (July 17-24, 2017) across the Canadian prairies.


Figure 5. Accumulated precipitation the past 30 days (June 24-July 24, 2017) across the Canadian prairies.


Figure 6.  Percent of average precipitation  for the across the Canadian prairies for
the growing season (April 1-July 24, 2017).

The lowest temperatures across the prairies over the past seven days (July 18-24, 2017) are mapped below.  

In contrast, the highest temperatures recorded over the past seven days (July 13-19, 2017) are presented below. 



The growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10ºC, March 1 – July 23, 2017) is below:


The growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5ºC, March 1 – July 23, 2017) is below:



The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.  Growers may wish to bookmark the AAFC Drought Watch Maps for the growing season.

Weekly Update – Weather Synopsis

Weather synopsis – Seven-day rainfall accumulations were generally greater than the previous week. Some areas in southern prairies received 10 to 30 mm of rain (Fig. 1). Total 30-day rainfall for June 17 to July 16, 2017, indicates that conditions are somewhat dryer than normal for most of the prairies. Figure 2 indicates that the regions with <40% of average rainfall (30-day) now include much of southern Saskatchewan, as well as large spots of southern Alberta and Manitoba. The percent of average precipitation for this growing season continues to be average for most of Alberta and below average for much of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (Fig. 3).

Figure 1.  Accumulated precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past  seven days (July 10-16, 2017).




Figure 2.  Accumulated precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past  30 days (June 17-July 16, 2017).




Figure 3.  Percent of average precipitation across the Canadian prairies from June 17-July 16, 2017.



Over the past week, the warmest temperatures occurred over a large area from Brandon to Edmonton and south to the Canada-USA border. Although temperatures were warmer (1°C) than last week, both the 7- and 30-day average temperatures were similar to long-term normal (LTN). Compared to 30-day average temperatures, Alberta was above normal whereas Saskatchewan and Manitoba were slightly below normal. 




The lowest temperatures across the prairies over the past seven days (July 13-19, 2017) are mapped below.  


In contrast, the highest temperatures recorded over the past seven days (July 13-19, 2017) are presented below.  


The growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10ºC, March 1 – July 13, 2017) is below:



The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.  Growers may wish to bookmark the AAFC Drought Watch Maps for the growing season.

Weekly Update – Weather Synopsis

Weather synopsis – Although temperatures were warmer than last week, both the seven- and 30-day average temperatures were similar to long term averages.





Compared to 30-day average temperatures, Alberta was above normal, whereas Saskatchewan and Manitoba were slightly below normal.



Central and northern regions of all three provinces reported increased rainfall amounts. Total 30-day rainfall accumulations indicate that conditions are normal to dryer than normal for most of the prairies.



Growing season (April 1 – July 10, 2017) percent of average precipitation is average for most of Alberta and below average for most of Saskatchewan and Manitoba.


The lowest temperatures across the prairies over the past seven days (July 5-11, 2017) are mapped below.  


In contrast, the highest temperatures recorded over the past seven days (July 5-11, 2017) are presented below.  





The updated growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5ºC, March 1 – July 9, 2017) is below:



While the growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10ºC, March 1 – July 9, 2017) is below:




The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.  Growers may wish to bookmark the AAFC Drought Watch Maps for the growing season.

Weekly Update – Weather Synopsis

Weather synopsis – This past week, average temperatures were slightly below long-term normals for mid-June.  Average temperatures for June indicate that Alberta temperatures were average, to above average, while Saskatchewan was slightly below than average temperatures. 







Total 30 day rainfall accumulations indicate that conditions are dryer than normal for most of Saskatchewan, the southern Peace River region and large areas of Manitoba.  Central and southern Alberta has had normal rainfall for June.



The lowest temperatures across the prairies over the past seven days (June 29-July 5, 2017) are mapped below.  


In contrast, the highest temperatures recorded over the past seven days (June 29-July 5, 2017) are presented below.  

The updated growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5ºC, March 1 – July 3, 2017) is below:



While the growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10ºC, March 1 – July 3, 2017) is below:


The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.  Growers may wish to bookmark the AAFC Drought Watch Maps for the growing season.

Weather Synopsis

Weather synopsis – Our AAFC Staff are busy surveying this week so be sure to check back for updates!


Precipitation for the growing season is presented below (April 1-June 27, 2017) followed by the precipitation expressed as Percent of Normal for the same period.



Over the past seven days, the greatest precipitation fell in northern growing areas along areas typically grouped as Boreal Plains (June 21-27, 2017).  Southern Alberta, southeast Saskatchewan and southwest Manitoba received the lowest amounts of precipitation over the same period.



The lowest temperatures across the prairies over the past seven days (June 21-27, 2017) are mapped below.  Although there was little chance of frost, much of the prairies recorded lows ranging from 0-4°C.



In contrast, the highest temperatures recorded over the past seven days (June 21-27, 2017) are presented below.  The field crops in some of these areas endured daily fluctuations of 20-25°C.

The updated growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5ºC, March 1 – June 25, 2017) is below:



While the growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10ºC, March 1 – June 25, 2017) is below:


The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.  Growers may wish to bookmark the AAFC Drought Watch Maps for the growing season.

Weekly Update – Weather Synopsis

Weather synopsis – Over this past week, average temperatures were similar to last week and only marginally cooler than long term averages for early June. Average temperatures were warmest in southern Manitoba with cooler conditions occurring across Alberta. 



 This second map presents the 30 Day Average Temperature. Average temperatures were greatest in southern regions of Manitoba and central Alberta.

The map below indicates that 7 Day Accumulated Precipitation was greatest across Alberta while central and southern Saskatchewan continued to be dry. 



The map below indicates that the rainfall amounts for the past month (May 13 – June 11) were average to above-average in Alberta and below-average for Manitoba and Saskatchewan.


The updated growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5ºC, March 1 – June 11, 2017) is below:



While the growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10ºC, March 1 – June 11, 2017) is below:


The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.  Growers may wish to bookmark the AAFC Drought Watch Maps for the growing season.

Weekly Update – Weather Synopsis

Weather synopsis – Meteorological conditions for the past month of May were generally warmer and dryer than normal. Average May temperatures were in the range of 0 to 2°C warmer than long term averages. 



May precipitation was below average across Manitoba and Saskatchewan; rainfall amounts were greatest across Alberta. The overall precipitation this growing season has been below normal to normal in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, but normal to well above normal in Alberta. 

Over this past week, average temperatures across the prairies were 2°C warmer than last week, and marginally warmer than long term averages for early June. Weekly average temperatures were greatest in southern regions of Manitoba and Alberta. Precipitation over the past week was greatest in central and northern Alberta. Most of Saskatchewan was dry over the past week. 





The map below reflects the Accumulated Precipitation for the Growing Season so far for the prairie provinces (i.e., April 1-June 5, 2017):


The map below shows the Lowest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (May 30-June 5, 2017) across the prairies:



Whereas the map below shows the Highest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (May 30-June 5, 2017):


The updated growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5ºC, March 1 – June 4, 2017) is below:



While the growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10ºC, March 1 – June 4, 2017) is below:


The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.  Growers may wish to bookmark the AAFC Drought Watch Maps for the growing season.

Weekly Update – Weather Synopsis

Weather synopsis – Across the prairies, this week’s average temperatures were slightly cooler than normal.

After a wetter week in central and northern Alberta, the most current 7-day rainfall was greater in the east of central Alberta into central Saskatchewan down into Manitoba. 

The 30-day rainfall amounts were average to below average across the southern prairies.

The map below reflects the Accumulated Precipitation for the Growing Season so far for the prairie provinces (i.e., April 1-May 31, 2017):


The map below shows the Lowest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (May 25-31, 2017) across the prairies:


Whereas the map below shows the Highest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (May 25-31, 2017):


The updated growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5ºC, March 1 – May 28, 2017) is below:



While the growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10ºC, March 1 – May 28, 2017) is below:


The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.  Growers may wish to bookmark the AAFC Drought Watch Maps for the growing season.

Weekly Update – Weather Synopsis

Weather synopsis – This week’s average temperatures were approximately 3°C cooler than normal (Fig. 1) and seven day precipitation accumulations were above normal.  The 30-day rainfall amounts were below average in eastern Saskatchewan and Manitoba (Fig. 2)


The map below reflects the Accumulated Precipitation for the Growing Season so far for the prairie provinces (i.e., April 1-May 24, 2017):


The map below shows the Lowest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (May 18-24, 2017) across the prairies:


Whereas the map below shows the Highest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (May 18-24, 2017):


The updated growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5ºC, March 1 – May 22, 2017) is below:



While the growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10ºC, March 1 – May 22, 2017) is below:


The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.  Growers may wish to bookmark the AAFC Drought Watch Maps for the growing season.

Weekly Update – Weather Synopsis

Weather synopsis – This week’s average temperatures were approximately 2°C cooler than normal and seven-day precipitation accumulations were above normal.  

Over the past month, precipitation was below average in Manitoba, but above average in northwest Alberta.


The map below reflects the Accumulated Precipitation for the Growing Season so far for the prairie provinces (i.e., April 1-May 17, 2017):


The map below shows the Lowest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (May 11-17, 2017) across the prairies:


Whereas the map below shows the Highest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (May 11-17, 2017):



The updated growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5ºC, March 1 – May 14, 2017) is below:



While the growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10ºC, March 1 – May 14, 2017) is below:


The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.  Growers may wish to bookmark the AAFC Drought Watch Maps for the growing season.

Weekly Update – Weather Synopsis

Weather synopsis – Many locations across southern Saskatchewan and Alberta experienced temperatures above 25°C this week. Average temperatures were warmest across southeastern Saskatchewan from May 1-8, 2017. 

The map below reflects the Accumulated Precipitation for the Growing Season so far for the prairie provinces (i.e., April 1-May 10, 2017):




Whereas the seven-day precipitation accumulations were greatest across Saskatchewan:



The map below shows the Lowest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (May 4-10, 2017) across the prairies:





Whereas the map below shows the Highest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (May 4-10, 2017):




The updated growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5ºC, March 1 – May 7, 2017) is below:





While the growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10ºC, March 1 – May 7, 2017) is below:


The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.  Growers may wish to bookmark the AAFC Drought Watch Maps for the growing season.


Weekly Update – Weather Synopsis

Weather synopsis – We begin with a synopsis of the weather situation starting with the map below which reflects the Accumulated Precipitation received during the winter (Nov 1, 2016 to Mar 31, 2017) across the prairies (Figure 1).

Figure 1. Accumulated precipitation across the Canadian prairies during the winter (November 1, 2016-March 31, 2017).


Average temperatures over the past month have been warmest across the southern prairies. April precipitation was greater across Manitoba and eastern Saskatchewan than western Saskatchewan or Alberta (Figure 2).  Compared to last year at this time, April 2017 was approximately 2°C cooler with marginally greater precipitation than last year (prairie-wide average values; Figure 3).
Figure 2. Average temperatures across the Canadian prairies the past 30 days (April 1-30, 2017).




Figure 3. Cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past 30 days (April 1-30, 2017).



The map below reflects the Highest Temperatures occurring over the past 7 days across the prairies.



The map below reflects the Lowest Temperatures occurring over the past 7 days across the prairies.



The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.  Growers may wish to bookmark the AAFC Drought Watch Maps for the growing season.


Weekly Weather Synopsis

Weather synopsis – The updated growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5ºC, March 1 – August 21, 2016) is below:




While the growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10ºC, March 1 – August 21, 2016) is below:




The map below shows the Lowest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (August 17-23, 2016) across the prairies:



The map below shows the Highest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (August 17-23, 2016):


The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.  Growers may wish to bookmark the AAFC Drought Watch Maps for the growing season.

Weekly Update – Weather Synopsis (updated)

Weather synopsis – The average temperature over the past seven days (August 7-14, 2016) was similar to Long Term Normal (LTN) values.



Across central Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba,  average cumulative rainfall was well above LTN values.





The average 30 day temperature for July 8-August 7, 2016, was similar to LTN and rainfall was 50% greater than LTN (average across the prairies). The wettest conditions have been in south and central areas of western Saskatchewan and central Alberta.






The average growing season temperature (April 1- August 7, 2016) was marginally warmer than normal. Growing season rainfall has been approximately 28% above average.






The map below shows the modelled soil moisture across the prairies (August 14, 2016).



The updated growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5ºC, March 1 – August 14, 2016) is below:






While the growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10ºC, March 1 – August 14, 2016) is below:







The map below shows the Lowest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (August 10 – August 16, 2016) across the prairies:


The map below shows the Highest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (August 10 – August 16, 2016):




The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.  Growers may wish to bookmark the AAFC Drought Watch Maps for the growing season.

Weekly Update – Weather Synopsis

Weather synopsis – This Post has been updated!  Please view the new Post here!

Weekly Update – Weather Synopsis

Weather synopsis – The average temperature over the past seven days (August 1-7, 2016) was approximately 1°C cooler than Long Term Normal (LTN).




Across the prairies the 7 Day Average Cumulative Rainfall was well above average (August 1-7, 2016)


The average 30 day temperature for July 8 to August 7 was similar LTN and rainfall was 50% greater than LTN (average across the prairies).

The average growing season temperature (April 1 – August 7) has been less than 1°C warmer than normal


Growing season rainfall has been approximately 27% above average.



The map below is the modelled soil moisture map for the prairies (up to August 7, 2016)



The map below reflects the 7 Day cumulative precipitation map (August 2 – August 8, 2016)


7 Day Accumulated Precip Aug 2-8.JPG

While the map below summarizes the cumulative precipitation for the growing season (April 1 – August 8, 2016).

Growing Season Accumulated Precip Apr 1-Aug 8.JPG
The updated growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5ºC, March 1 – August 7, 2016) is below:


GDD Base 5 Aug 7

While the growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10ºC, March 1 – August 7, 2016) is below:

GDD Base 10 Aug 7

The map below shows the Lowest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (August 2 – August 8, 2016) across the prairies:

7 Days Lowest Temp Aug 2-8.JPG
The map below shows the Highest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (August 2 – August 8, 2016):


7 Days Highest Temp Aug 2-8.JPG

Weekly Update – Weather Synopsis

The map below reflects the 7 Day cumulative precipitation map (July 26-August 1, 2016)


While the map below summarizes the cumulative precipitation for the growing season (April 1-August 1, 2016).



The accumulated precipitation for the growing season (April 1-August 1, 2016) is mapped below.



The updated growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5ºC, March 1 – July 31, 2016) is below:



While the growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10ºC, March 1 – July 31, 2016) is below:




The map below shows the Lowest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (July 26-August 1, 2016) across the prairies:



The map below shows the Highest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (July 26-August 1, 2016):



While the map below reflects the number of consecutive days above 25°C across the prairies for the growing season as of July 29, 2016.

The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.  Growers may wish to bookmark the AAFC Drought Watch Maps for the growing season.


Additional precipitation and temperature data or maps are provided by the following:

Manitoba Agriculture’s Crop Weather Report
Alberta Agriculture and Food’s Weather Stations
Saskatchewan’s Cumulative Precipitation Map
Environment Canada’s Historical Data Interface

Weekly Update – Weather Synopsis

Across prairies, the 7-day average cumulative rainfall also brought some strong storms with rain, wind and worse.


The following map reflects the number of days above 25°C across the prairies for the growing season as of July 18, 2016.



The accumulated precipitation for the growing season (April 1-July 24, 2016) is mapped below.




The map below shows the Lowest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (July 20-26, 2016) across the prairies:



The map below shows the Highest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (July 20-26, 2016):



The updated growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5ºC, March 1 – July 24, 2016) is below:



While the growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10ºC, March 1 – July 24, 2016) is below:




The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.  Growers may wish to bookmark the AAFC Drought Watch Maps for the growing season.


Additional precipitation and temperature data or maps are provided by the following:

Manitoba Agriculture’s Crop Weather Report
Alberta Agriculture and Food’s Weather Stations
Saskatchewan’s Cumulative Precipitation Map
Environment Canada’s Historical Data Interface

Weekly Update – Weather Synopsis

The average temperature over the past seven days (July 11-17, 2016) was slightly cooler than Long Term Normal (LTN). 





Across the southern prairies, the 7-day average cumulative rainfall was well above LTN values.





The average 30 day temperature for June 17 to July 17, 2016, was similar LTN and rainfall was 20% greater than LTN.




The average growing season temperature (April 1 – July 17, 2016) has been less than 1°C warmer than normal. 





Growing season rainfall has been approximately 20% above average.



The map below is the modelled soil moisture map for the prairies (up to July 17, 2016).





The map below shows the Lowest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (July 13-19, 2016) across the prairies:




The map below shows the Highest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (July 13-19, 2016):



The updated growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5ºC, March 1 – July 17, 2016) is below:



While the growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10ºC, March 1 – July 17, 2015) is below:




The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.  Growers may wish to bookmark the AAFC Drought Watch Maps for the growing season.


Additional precipitation and temperature data or maps are provided by the following:
Manitoba AGriculture’s Crop Weather Report
Alberta Agriculture and Food’s Weather Stations
Environment Canada’s Historical Data Interface

Weekly Update – Weather Synopsis

Average temperatures for June 27-July 3 were warmer in Alberta than Manitoba. This week the trend was reversed with the warmest temperatures being reported from Manitoba. Prairie wide, the average temperature was similar to Long Term Normals (LTN). 



Seven day (July 4-10, 2016) cumulative rainfall was greater in Manitoba and eastern Saskatchewan and Alberta and western Saskatchewan. Average cumulative rainfall was marginally greater than LTN values.

The average 30 day temperature (June 10-July 10) was 0.5 °C warmer than LTN values.


The average 30 day rainfall was 20% greater than LTN values.



The average growing season temperature (April 1 – July 10) has been approximately 1 °C warmer than normal. Growing season rainfall has been approximately 10% above average. 


The map below shows the Lowest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (July 5-11, 2016) across the prairies:


The map below shows the Highest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (July 5-11, 2016):



The updated growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5ºC, March 1 – July 10, 2016) is below:



While the growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10ºC, March 1 – July 10, 2015) is below:






The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.  Growers may wish to bookmark the AAFC Drought Watch Maps for the growing season.



Additional precipitation and temperature data or maps are provided by the following:
Manitoba AGriculture’s Crop Weather Report
Alberta Agriculture and Food’s Weather Stations
Environment Canada’s Historical Data Interface



Weekly Update – Weather Synopsis

Staff are busy surveying so some maps are not available this week.

Warmer temperatures were observed throughout the prairies and the west was drier compared to the east.


The Accumulated Precipitation the past 7 days (June 22-28, 2016) is below:



The map below reflects the Accumulated Precipitation for the Growing Season so far for the prairie provinces (i.e., May 1-June 26, 2016):





Compared to last week, overnight temperatures were warmer during the past 7 days.  The map below shows the Lowest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (June 22-28, 2016) across the prairies:



The map below shows the Highest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (June 22-28, 2016):





The updated growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5ºC, March 1 – June 26, 2016) is below:





While the growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10ºC, March 1 – June 26, 2015) is below:




The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.  Growers may wish to bookmark the AAFC Drought Watch Maps for the growing season.

Weekly Update – Weather Synopsis

Across the prairies, weather conditions were warmer and wetter than long term average values for the period of June 6-13, 2016The average temperature was 15°C and was approximately 2°C warmer than the previous week. 



Across the prairies, weather conditions were very similar to long term average (LTN) values for the period of June 13-19, 2016. The average temperature was 14 °C and was approximately 1 °C warmer than the previous week. Temperatures in southern MB were 5-6 °C warmer than many locations in AB. 







The Peace River region was wetter than normal while most of southern AB and MB were dryer than normal. 

Soil moisture conditions are wettest in the Peace River region and across southern SK and MB. Southern AB and central SK have the driest soil moisture conditions.



The map below reflects the Accumulated Precipitation for the Growing Season so far for the prairie provinces (i.e., April 1-June 20, 2016):

Compared to last week, overnight temperatures were warmer during the past 7 days.  The map below shows the Lowest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (June 14-20, 2016) across the prairies:

The map below shows the Highest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (June 14-20, 2016):

The updated growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5ºC, March 1 – June 19, 2016) is below:

While the growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10ºC, March 1 – June 19, 2015) is below:


The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.  Growers may wish to bookmark the AAFC Drought Watch Maps for the growing season.

Weekly Update – Weather Synopsis

Across the prairies, meteorological conditions were similar to long term average values for the period of May 30 – June 5, 2016. The average temperature was 12.8 °C and was 1.5 °C warmer than the previous week. 



This week’s rainfall was generally greater than long term average amounts. Since April 1, most regions have reported above normal precipitation.  Southeastern Saskatchewan and southern Manitoba reported the highest rainfall amounts.  The map below shows the Accumulated Precipitation the past 7 days (i.e., May 30-June 5, 2016): 



Soil moisture levels (refer to model output map) were predicted to be above average across most of the prairies.  

For the period of May 1-31, 2016, conditions were cooler and wetter in Alberta than Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

The map below reflects the Accumulated Precipitation for the Growing Season so far for the prairie provinces (i.e., April 1-May 30, 2016):

Compared to last week, overnight temperatures were warmer the past 7 days.  The map below shows the Lowest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (June 1-7, 2016) across the prairies:

The map below shows the Highest Temperatures the Past 7 Days (June 1-7, 2016):

The updated growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5ºC, March 1 – June 5, 2016) is below:

While the growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10ºC, March 1 – June 5, 2015) is below:



The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.  Growers may wish to bookmark the AAFC Drought Watch Maps for the growing season.

Environment Canada’s weather radar and precipitation events

If your field is near one of Environment Canada’s radar
stations, you can access weather
radar maps
in video format which show the past 1hr OR 3hrs of precipitation
events.  These maps can help growers
review where and how much precipitation fell nearby.
We included screen shots of Environment Canada’s webpages
below and we added red text and arrows to help.