Weather synopsis

An abbreviated synopsis is provided for the final Weekly Update of the 2020 growing season. It was a warm week for most of the prairies! The highest temperatures the past seven days across the prairies are represented in Figure 1 and ranged from <22 to >35 °C.

Figure 1. Highest temperatures (°C) observed across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (April 1-August 19, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (20Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

All those high temperatures advanced the accumulation of heat units across the prairies. The growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5 ºC, April 1-August 17, 2020) is below (Fig. 2) while the growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10 ºC, April 1-August 17, 2020) is shown in Figure 3.

Figure 2. Growing degree day map (Base 5 °C) observed across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-August 17, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (20Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209
Figure 3. Growing degree day map (Base 10 °C) observed across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-August 17, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (20Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

So far this growing season, the number of days above 25 °C ranges from 0-10 days in the northwest of the prairies then increases up to 61-70 days in southern Manitoba (Fig. 4). In comparison, the number of days above 30 °C ranges up to 25-27 days in southern Saskatchewan and southern Manitoba (Fig. 5)

Figure 4. Number of days above 25 °C observed across the Canadian prairies this growing season (April 1-August 19, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (20Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209
Figure 5. Number of days above 30 °C observed across the Canadian prairies this growing season (April 1-August 19, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (20Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

As fields continue to mature in late August and in to September, growers will be watching for cool evenings. The lowest temperatures the past seven days across the prairies are represented in Figure 6 and ranged from <1 to >13 °C.

Figure 6. Lowest temperatures (°C) observed across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (April 1-August 19, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (20Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

Cumulative rainfall for the past 7 days was lowest across central and southern regions of Alberta and Saskatchewan while western and northern areas of the Peace River region AND eastern Saskatchewan plus much of Manitoba received more moisture (Fig. 7). Cumulative 30-day (Fig. 8) and rainfall for the growing season (April 1-August 19, 2020; Fig. 9) are below.

Figure 7. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (as of August 19, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (20Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209
Figure 8. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past 30 days (as of August 19, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (20Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209
Figure 9. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (as of August 19, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (20Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. Growers can bookmark the AAFC Current Conditions Drought Watch Maps for the growing season. Historical weather data can be access at the AAFC Drought Watch website, Environment Canada’s Historical Data website, or your provincial weather network.

Provincial insect pest report links

Provincial entomologists provide insect pest updates throughout the growing season so link to their information: 

Manitoba‘s Crop Pest Updates for 2020 are available. Access the August 18 2020 report. The summary indicates that, “Grasshoppers continue to be the insect of greatest concern. Some have also commented on the high levels of flea beetles being observed in canola currently.”

Saskatchewan‘s Crop Production News (for Issue 7). Read Issue 7 which includes articles on Pest Scouting 101- Harvest, Promoting and Enhancing Beneficial Insects, and What to Do with Unwanted Pesticides and Obsolete Livestock Medications. Issue 5 included articles on Bertha armyworm, Cabbage seedpod weevil,  FieldWatch – Fostering Communication Between Applicators and Producers, and Look What the Wind Blew in! Diamondback Moths Arrived Early This Spring. Issue #4 included articles on Pest Scouting 101: Mid-Summer, and The Wheat Midge.

•  Alberta Agriculture and Forestry’s Agri-News occasionally includes insect-related information or Twitter users can connect to #ABBugChat Wednesdays at 10:00 am.

Crop report links


Click the provincial name below to link to online crop reports produced by:

• Manitoba Agriculture and Rural Initiatives – Other viewing options include subscribing to receive or access a PDF of August 18, 2020 report.

• Saskatchewan Agriculture  or access a PDF of August 17, 2020 report.

• Alberta Agriculture and Forestry or access a PDF of August 11, 2020 report.

The following crop reports are also available:

• The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) produces a Crop Progress Report (read the August 17, 2020 edition).

• The USDA’s Weekly Weather and Crop Bulletin (read the August 18, 2020 edition). 

Provincial insect pest report links

Provincial entomologists provide insect pest updates throughout the growing season so link to their information: 

Manitoba‘s Crop Pest Updates for 2020 are available. Access the August 11 2020 report. The summary indicates that, “Grasshoppers continue to be the insect of greatest concern. The diamondback moth populations in eastern Manitoba that were of concern in some fields a couple of weeks ago seem to have diminished. Spider mites are being noticed in some soybean fields, but no insecticide applications for them have been reported yet.”

Saskatchewan‘s Crop Production News (for Issue 7). Read Issue 7 which includes articles on Pest Scouting 101- Harvest, Promoting and Enhancing Beneficial Insects, and What to Do with Unwanted Pesticides and Obsolete Livestock Medications. Issue 5 included articles on Bertha armyworm, Cabbage seedpod weevil,  FieldWatch – Fostering Communication Between Applicators and Producers, and Look What the Wind Blew in! Diamondback Moths Arrived Early This Spring. Issue #4 included articles on Pest Scouting 101: Mid-Summer, and The Wheat Midge.

•  Alberta Agriculture and Forestry’s Agri-News occasionally includes insect-related information or Twitter users can connect to #ABBugChat Wednesdays at 10:00 am.

Crop report links

Click the provincial name below to link to online crop reports produced by:

• Manitoba Agriculture and Rural Initiatives – Other viewing options include subscribing to receive or access a PDF of August 11, 2020 report.

• Saskatchewan Agriculture  or access a PDF of August 10, 2020 report.

• Alberta Agriculture and Forestry or access a PDF of July 28, 2020 report.

The following crop reports are also available:

• The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) produces a Crop Progress Report (read the August 10, 2020 edition).

• The USDA’s Weekly Weather and Crop Bulletin (read the August 11, 2020 edition). 

Provincial insect pest report links


Provincial entomologists
provide insect pest updates throughout the growing season so link to their information: 

Manitoba‘s Crop Pest Updates for 2020 are available. Access the August 5, 2020 report. The summary indicates that, “Grasshoppers are currently the biggest insect concern. Some sunflower midge has been observed in sunflowers in the Eastern region, mainly around field edges, which is typical for this insect. Lygus bugs have also been noted in sunflower fields. Diamondback moth larvae in canola remains a concern for growers and agronomists in the Eastern region, with lots of scouting and some limited insecticide applications occurring.”

Saskatchewan‘s Crop Production News (for Issue 6). Read Issue 5 which includes articles on Bertha armyworm, Cabbage seedpod weevil,  FieldWatch – Fostering Communication Between Applicators and Producers, and Look What the Wind Blew in! Diamondback Moths Arrived Early This Spring. Issue #4 included articles on Pest Scouting 101: Mid-Summer, and The Wheat Midge.

•  Alberta Agriculture and Forestry’s Agri-News occasionally includes insect-related information or Twitter users can connect to #ABBugChat Wednesdays at 10:00 am.

Crop report links

Click the provincial name below to link to online crop reports produced by:

• Manitoba Agriculture and Rural Initiatives – Other viewing options include subscribing to receive or access a PDF of August 4, 2020 report.

• Saskatchewan Agriculture  or access a PDF of July 28-August 3, 2020 report.

• Alberta Agriculture and Forestry or access a PDF of July 28, 2020 report.

The following crop reports are also available:

• The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) produces a Crop Progress Report (read the August 3, 2020 edition).

• The USDA’s Weekly Weather and Crop Bulletin (read the August 4, 2020 edition). 

Provincial insect pest report links

Provincial entomologists provide insect pest updates throughout the growing season so link to their information: 

Manitoba‘s Crop Pest Updates for 2020 are available. Access the July 29, 2020 report. The summary indicates that, “Grasshoppers are the insect of greatest concern to field crops in Manitoba currently. Some populations of diamondback moth above economic threshold have been found in eastern Manitoba recently.”

Saskatchewan‘s Crop Production News (for Issue 6). Read Issue 5 which includes articles on Bertha armyworm, Cabbage seedpod weevil,  FieldWatch – Fostering Communication Between Applicators and Producers, and Look What the Wind Blew in! Diamondback Moths Arrived Early This Spring. Issue #4 included articles on Pest Scouting 101: Mid-Summer, and The Wheat Midge.

•  Alberta Agriculture and Forestry’s Agri-News occasionally includes insect-related information or Twitter users can connect to #ABBugChat Wednesdays at 10:00 am.

Crop report links

Click the provincial name below to link to online crop reports produced by:

• Manitoba Agriculture and Rural Initiatives – Other viewing options include subscribing to receive or access a PDF of July 28, 2020 report.

• Saskatchewan Agriculture  or access a PDF of July 21-27, 2020 report.

• Alberta Agriculture and Forestry or access a PDF of July 14, 2020 report.

The following crop reports are also available:

• The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) produces a Crop Progress Report (read the July 27, 2020 edition).

• The USDA’s Weekly Weather and Crop Bulletin (read the July 28, 2020 edition). 

Provincial insect pest report links

Provincial entomologists provide insect pest updates throughout the growing season so link to their information: 

Manitoba‘s Crop Pest Updates for 2020 are available. Access the July 22, 2020 report. The summary indicates that, “Grasshoppers and armyworms continue to be the insects of greatest concern. Twostriped grasshopper is mainly into the later nymph stages with some adults present; clearwinged grasshopper adults are present. Lots of reports of Cotesia pupal clusters in some of the cereals, resulting from parasitized armyworm populations. Armyworms seem to be turning to pupae and levels dropping in some areas. Jack pine budworm, a moth whose larvae feed on pines trees, is very abundant this year, and agronomists are noticing the moths around farmyards are enquiring regarding what it is and what it feeds on.”

Saskatchewan‘s Crop Production News and read Issue 5 which includes articles on Bertha armyworm, Cabbage seedpod weevil,  FieldWatch – Fostering Communication Between Applicators and Producers, and Look What the Wind Blew in! Diamondback Moths Arrived Early This Spring. Issue #4 included articles on Pest Scouting 101: Mid-Summer, and The Wheat Midge.

•  Alberta Agriculture and Forestry’s Agri-News occasionally includes insect-related information or Twitter users can connect to #ABBugChat Wednesdays at 10:00 am.

Crop report links

Click the provincial name below to link to online crop reports produced by:

• Manitoba Agriculture and Rural Initiatives – Other viewing options include subscribing to receive or access a PDF of July 21, 2020 report.

• Saskatchewan Agriculture  or access a PDF of July 14-20, 2020 report.

• Alberta Agriculture and Forestry or access a PDF of July 14, 2020 report.

The following crop reports are also available:

• The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) produces a Crop Progress Report (read the July 20, 2020 edition).

• The USDA’s Weekly Weather and Crop Bulletin (read the July 21, 2020 edition). 

Provincial insect pest report links

Provincial entomologists provide insect pest updates throughout the growing season so link to their information: 

Manitoba‘s Crop Pest Updates for 2020 are available. Access the July 15, 2020 report. The summary indicates that, “Armyworms and grasshoppers continue to be the biggest insects concern on crops in Manitoba. Scouting for diamondback moth continues, with just one report of spraying for diamondback moth. Spraying for goosefoot groundling moth and a stem borer maggot has been reported from quinoa. Green cloverworm has been found on soybeans in eastern Manitoba, but not at levels that would be economical. Pupal clusters of Cotesia, a parasitoid of armyworms and other caterpillars, have been reported to be quite abundant in some of the fields that had armyworms.”

Saskatchewan‘s Crop Production News and read Issue 5 which includes articles on Bertha armyworm, Cabbage seedpod weevil,  FieldWatch – Fostering Communication Between Applicators and Producers, and Look What the Wind Blew in! Diamondback Moths Arrived Early This Spring. Issue #4 included articles on Pest Scouting 101: Mid-Summer, and The Wheat Midge.

•  Alberta Agriculture and Forestry’s Agri-News occasionally includes insect-related information or Twitter users can connect to #ABBugChat Wednesdays at 10:00 am.

Crop report links

Click the provincial name below to link to online crop reports produced by:

• Manitoba Agriculture and Rural Initiatives – Other viewing options include subscribing to receive or access a PDF of July 14, 2020 report.

• Saskatchewan Agriculture  or access a PDF of July 7-13, 2020 report.

• Alberta Agriculture and Forestry or access a PDF of June 29, 2020 report.

The following crop reports are also available:

• The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) produces a Crop Progress Report (read the July 13, 2020 edition).

• The USDA’s Weekly Weather and Crop Bulletin (read the July 14, 2020 edition). 

Diamondback moth

Once diamondback moth is present in the area, it is important to monitor individual canola fields for larvae.  Warm growing conditions can quickly translate into multiple generations in a very short period!

Wind Trajectory Updates – Completed for 2020 growing season as of Week 09 (released June 22, 2020).

Weekly Pheromone-baited Trapping Results – Early season detection of diamondback moth is improved through the use of pheromone-baited delta traps deployed in fields across the Canadian prairies.  Click each province to access moth reporting numbers observed in AlbertaSaskatchewan and Manitoba as they become available. Check these sites to assess cumulative counts and relative risk in your geographic region.

Monitoring: Remove the plants in an area measuring 0.1 m² (about 12″ square), beat them on to a clean surface and count the number of larvae (Fig. 1) dislodged from the plant. Repeat this procedure at least in five locations in the field to get an accurate count.

Figure 1. Diamondback larva measuring ~8 mm long.Note brown head capsule and forked appearance of prolegs on posterior.
Figure 2. Diamondback moth pupa within silken cocoon.

Economic threshold for diamondback moth in canola at the advanced pod stage is 20 to 30 larvae/ 0.1  (approximately 2-3 larvae per plant).  Economic thresholds for canola or mustard in the early flowering stage are not available. However, insecticide applications are likely required at larval densities of 10 to 15 larvae/ 0.1 m² (approximately 1-2 larvae per plant).

Figure 3. Diamondback moth.

Biological and monitoring information for DBM is posted by Manitoba AgricultureSaskatchewan Agriculture, and the Prairie Pest Monitoring Network.  

More information about Diamondback moths can be found by accessing the pages from the  “Field Crop and Forage Pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada: Identification and Field Guide“.  View ONLY the Diamondback moth page but remember the guide is available as a free downloadable document as both an English-enhanced or French-enhanced version.

Provincial insect pest report links

Provincial entomologists provide insect pest updates throughout the growing season so link to their information: 

Manitoba‘s Crop Pest Updates for 2020 are available. Access the July 8, 2020 report. The summary indicates that, “Armyworms are being found at high levels in many cereal and forage grass fields in the Eastern, Interlake, Central, and Southwest regions. High levels of grasshoppers continue to be found and controlled in some areas.”

Saskatchewan‘s Crop Production News and read Issue 4 which includes articles on Pest Scouting 101: Mid-Summer, and The Wheat Midge.

•  Alberta Agriculture and Forestry’s Agri-News occasionally includes insect-related information or Twitter users can connect to #ABBugChat Wednesdays at 10:00 am.

Crop reports

Click the provincial name below to link to online crop reports produced by:

• Manitoba Agriculture and Rural Initiatives – Other viewing options include subscribing to receive or access a PDF of July 7, 2020 report.

• Saskatchewan Agriculture  or access a PDF of June 30-July 6, 2020 report.

• Alberta Agriculture and Forestry or access a PDF of June 29, 2020 report.


The following crop reports are also available:

• The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) produces a Crop Progress Report (read the July 6, 2020 edition).

• The USDA’s Weekly Weather and Crop Bulletin (read the July 7, 2020 edition). 

Pea leaf weevil

Pea Leaf Weevil (Sitona lineatus– Model runs for Red Deer and Saskatoon were projected to June 30, 2019. Results indicated that oviposition is well underway at both locations.  

Figure 1. Predicted status of pea leaf weevil populations near Red Deer AB projected to June 30, 2019, using long term average temperatures.
Figure 2.  Predicted status of pea leaf weevil populations near Saskatoon SK projected to June 30, 2019, using long term average temperatures.

This week, pea leaf weevil and its doppelgangers were featured as part of the INSECT OF THE WEEK.  

Adults will feed upon the leaf margins and growing points of legume seedlings (alfalfa, clover, dry beans, faba beans, peas) and produce a characteristic, scalloped (notched) edge.  Females lay 1000 to 1500 eggs in the soil either near or on developing pea or faba bean plants from May to June.

Biological and monitoring information related to pea leaf weevil in field crops is posted by the province of Alberta and in the PPMN monitoring protocol.

Also refer to the pea leaf weevil page within the “Field Crop and Forage Pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada: Identification and management field guide” – both English-enhanced or French-enhanced versions are available.  A review of this insect was published in 2011 in Prairie Soils and Crops by Carcamo and Vankosky.

Pea leaf weevil

Pea Leaf Weevil (Sitona lineatus– Model runs for Red Deer AB (Fig. 1) and Swift Current SK (Fig. 2) were projected to June 15, 2019. Results indicated that oviposition should begin early next week. Model predictions, based on long term normal weather data predict that initial hatch near Saskatoon should occur on May 29th.

Figure 1. Projected predicted status of pea leaf weevil populations near Red Deer AB to
June 15, 2019 using long term average temperatures.
Figure 2. Projected predicted status of pea leaf weevil populations near Swift Current SK to
June 15, 2019 using long term average temperatures.

Pea leaf weevils emerge in the spring primarily by flying (at temperatures above 17ºC) or they may walk short distances. Pea leaf weevil movement into peas and faba beans is achieved primarily through flight.  Adults are slender, greyish-brown measuring approximately 5 mm in length (Fig. 3, Left).  

The pea leaf weevil resembles the sweet clover weevil (Sitona cylindricollis) but the former is distinguished by three light-coloured stripes extending length-wise down thorax and sometimes the abdomen.  All species of Sitona, including the pea leaf weevil, have a short snout.  

Figure 3.  Comparison images and descriptions of four Sitona species adults including pea leaf weevil (Left).

Adults will feed upon the leaf margins and growing points of legume seedlings (alfalfa, clover, dry beans, faba beans, peas) and produce a characteristic, scalloped (notched) edge.  Females lay 1000 to 1500 eggs in the soil either near or on developing pea or faba bean plants from May to June.

Biological and monitoring information related to pea leaf weevil in field crops is posted by the province of Alberta and in the PPMN monitoring protocol.

Also refer to the pea leaf weevil page within the “Field Crop and Forage Pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada: Identification and management field guide” – both English-enhanced or French-enhanced versions are available.  A review of this insect was published in 2011 in Prairie Soils and Crops by Carcamo and Vankosky.

Pea leaf weevil

Pea Leaf Weevil (Sitona lineatus– Model runs for Red Deer AB (Fig. 1) and Swift Current SK (Fig. 2) were projected to June 15, 2019. Results indicated that oviposition should begin at the end of May. Model predictions, based on long term normal weather data, predict that initial hatch near Saskatoon should occur on May 29th.

Figure 1.  Projected predicted status of pea leaf weevil populations near Red Deer AB to June 15, 2019 using long term average temperatures.
Figure 2.  Projected predicted status of pea leaf weevil populations near Swift Current SK to June 15, 2019 using long term average temperatures.

Pea leaf weevils emerge in the spring primarily by flying (at temperatures above 17ºC) or they may walk short distances. Pea leaf weevil movement into peas and faba beans is achieved primarily through flight.  Adults are slender, greyish-brown measuring approximately 5 mm in length (Fig. 3, Left).  

The pea leaf weevil resembles the sweet clover weevil (Sitona cylindricollis) but the former is distinguished by three light-coloured stripes extending length-wise down thorax and sometimes the abdomen.  All species of Sitona, including the pea leaf weevil, have a short snout.  

Figure 3.  Comparison images and descriptions of four Sitona species adults including pea leaf weevil (Left).

Adults will feed upon the leaf margins and growing points of legume seedlings (alfalfa, clover, dry beans, faba beans, peas) and produce a characteristic, scalloped (notched) edge.  Females lay 1000 to 1500 eggs in the soil either near or on developing pea or faba bean plants from May to June.

Biological and monitoring information related to pea leaf weevil in field crops is posted by the province of Alberta and in the PPMN monitoring protocol.

Also refer to the pea leaf weevil page within the “Field Crop and Forage Pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada: Identification and management field guide” – both English-enhanced or French-enhanced versions are available.  A review of this insect was published in 2011 in Prairie Soils and Crops by Carcamo and Vankosky.

Pea leaf weevil

Pea Leaf Weevil (Sitona lineatus– Model runs for Red Deer AB (Fig. 1) and Swift Current SK (Fig. 2) were projected to June 15, 2019. Results indicated that oviposition should begin at the end of May. Model predictions, based on long term normal weather data, predict that initial hatch near Saskatoon should occur on May 29th.

Figure 1.  Projected predicted status of pea leaf weevil populations near Red Deer AB to June 15, 2019 using long term average temperatures.
Figure 2.  Projected predicted status of pea leaf weevil populations near Swift Current SK to June 15, 2019 using long term average temperatures.

Pea leaf weevils emerge in the spring primarily by flying (at temperatures above 17ºC) or they may walk short distances. Pea leaf weevil movement into peas and faba beans is achieved primarily through flight.  Adults are slender, greyish-brown measuring approximately 5 mm in length (Fig. 3, Left).  

The pea leaf weevil resembles the sweet clover weevil (Sitona cylindricollis) but the former is distinguished by three light-coloured stripes extending length-wise down thorax and sometimes the abdomen.  All species of Sitona, including the pea leaf weevil, have a short snout.  

Figure 3.  Comparison images and descriptions of four Sitona species adults including pea leaf weevil (Left).

Adults will feed upon the leaf margins and growing points of legume seedlings (alfalfa, clover, dry beans, faba beans, peas) and produce a characteristic, scalloped (notched) edge.  Females lay 1000 to 1500 eggs in the soil either near or on developing pea or faba bean plants from May to June.

Biological and monitoring information related to pea leaf weevil in field crops is posted by the province of Alberta and in the PPMN monitoring protocol.

Also refer to the pea leaf weevil page within the “Field Crop and Forage Pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada: Identification and management field guide” – both English-enhanced or French-enhanced versions are available.  A review of this insect was published in 2011 in Prairie Soils and Crops by Carcamo and Vankosky.

Pea leaf weevil

Pea Leaf Weevil (Sitona lineatus– The PLW model was run for Red Deer AB (Fig. 1) and Saskatoon SK (Fig. 2). The predictive model outputs suggest that PLW adults are active but oviposition has not begun. 

Figure 1. Predicted status of pea leaf weevil populations near Red Deer as of  May 7, 2019. 
Figure 2. Predicted status of pea leaf weevil populations near Saskatoon SK as of May 7, 2019.

Pea leaf weevils emerge in the spring primarily by flying (at temperatures above 17ºC) or they may walk short distances. Pea leaf weevil movement into peas and faba beans is achieved primarily through flight.  Adults are slender, greyish-brown measuring approximately 5 mm in length (Fig. 3, Left).  

The pea leaf weevil resembles the sweet clover weevil (Sitona cylindricollis) but the former is distinguished by three light-coloured stripes extending length-wise down thorax and sometimes the abdomen.  All species of Sitona, including the pea leaf weevil, have a short snout.  

Figure 3.  Comparison images and descriptions of four Sitona species adults including pea leaf weevil (Left).

Adults will feed upon the leaf margins and growing points of legume seedlings (alfalfa, clover, dry beans, faba beans, peas) and produce a characteristic, scalloped (notched) edge.  Females lay 1000 to 1500 eggs in the soil either near or on developing pea or faba bean plants from May to June.

Biological and monitoring information related to pea leaf weevil in field crops is posted by the province of Alberta and in the PPMN monitoring protocol.

Also refer to the pea leaf weevil page within the “Field Crop and Forage Pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada: Identification and management field guide” – both English-enhanced or French-enhanced versions are available.  A review of this insect was published in 2011 in Prairie Soils and Crops by Carcamo and Vankosky.

Pea leaf weevil

Pea Leaf Weevil (Sitona lineatus– The PLW model was run for Red Deer AB (Fig. 1) and Saskatoon SK (Fig. 2). The output suggests that PLW are beginning to become active and will begin to fly on warmer days (Figs. 1 and 2). 

Figure 1.  Predicted overwintered PLW adults near Red Deer AB as of April 30, 2019. 
Figure 2.  Predicted overwintered PLW adults near Saskatoon SK as of April 30, 2019. 

Pea leaf weevils emerge in the spring primarily by flying (at temperatures above 17ºC) or they may walk short distances. Pea leaf weevil movement into peas and faba beans is achieved primarily through flight.  Adults are slender, greyish-brown measuring approximately 5 mm in length (Fig. 3, Left).  

The pea leaf weevil resembles the sweet clover weevil (Sitona cylindricollis) but the former is distinguished by three light-coloured stripes extending length-wise down thorax and sometimes the abdomen.  All species of Sitona, including the pea leaf weevil, have a short snout.  

Figure 3.  Comparison images and descriptions of four Sitona species adults including pea leaf weevil (Left).

Adults will feed upon the leaf margins and growing points of legume seedlings (alfalfa, clover, dry beans, faba beans, peas) and produce a characteristic, scalloped (notched) edge.  Females lay 1000 to 1500 eggs in the soil either near or on developing pea or faba bean plants from May to June.

Biological and monitoring information related to pea leaf weevil in field crops is posted by the province of Alberta and in the PPMN monitoring protocol.

Also refer to the pea leaf weevil page within the “Field Crop and Forage Pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada: Identification and management field guide” – both English-enhanced or French-enhanced versions are available.  A review of this insect was published in 2011 in Prairie Soils and Crops by Carcamo and Vankosky.

2018 Swede Midge Pheromone Monitoring Results

In 2018, swede midge pheromone traps were deployed at 41 sites across the Prairie region of Canada to monitor adult populations of this brassica pest. Of the 41 trap sites, 16 were located in Alberta, 19 in Saskatchewan (where positive swede midge identifications were made in 2007 and 2009), and 6 in Manitoba.

None of the traps were positive for swede midge in 2018. 

We are grateful to all of the producers, agronomists, and cooperators who participated in the 2018 swede midge monitoring project. Without your assistance, we could not have supported such a thorough and widespread pheromone monitoring program.

We also extend our thanks to Jonathon Williams for organizing the program, distributing trapping materials, and processing returned sticky cards for adult swede midge.

Because of the serious threat that swede midge poses to canola production, it is vital that monitoring for swede midge continues across the Prairies. At this time, plans are being made for the 2019 swede midge monitoring program. We hope that we can count on your support and cooperation in 2019.

At this time, plans are being made for the 2019 swede midge monitoring program. Agrologists or growers interested in performing weekly monitoring in 2019 are encouraged to contact Jonathon Williams, Boyd Mori, or Meghan Vankosky for more information.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Saskatoon Research and Development Centre

More information about swede midge can be found by:

Pea leaf weevil

Pea Leaf Weevil (Sitona lineatus– Over the past ten days newly emerged adult pea leaf weevils are predicted to be emerging from pea crops (Fig. 1).  

Figure 1. Predicted pea leaf weevil phenology at Saskatoon (A) and Lethbridge (B). Values are based on model simulations for the current growing season (April 1 – July 30, 2018).

Pea leaf weevil larvae develop under the soil over a period of 30 to 60 days. They are “C” shaped with a dark brown head capsule. The rest of the body is a milky-white color (Fig. 2 A). Larvae develop through five instar stages. In the 5th instar, larvae range in length from 3.5 – 5.5 mm. First instar larvae bury into the soil after hatching, and search out root nodules on field pea and faba bean plants. Larvae enter and consume the microbial contents of the root nodules (Fig. 2 B). These root nodules are responsible for nitrogen-fixation, thus pea leaf weevil larval feeding can affect plant yield and the plant’s ability to input nitrogen into the soil. 

Figure 2.  Pea leaf weevil larva in soil (A) and field pea root nodules damaged by larval feeding (B).  Photos: L. Dosdall).

Biological and monitoring information related to pea leaf weevil in field crops is posted by the province of Alberta and in the PPMN monitoring protocol.

Also refer to the pea leaf weevil page within the “Field Crop and Forage Pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada: Identification and management field guide” – both English-enhanced or French-enhanced versions are available.  A review of this insect was published in 2011 in Prairie Soils and Crops by Carcamo and Vankosky.

Pea leaf weevil

Pea Leaf Weevil (Sitona lineatus– As of June 24, 2018, the PLW model predicted that hatch is nearly complete and the population is primarily in the larval stage in the Saskatoon area (Fig. 1).  Development in 2018 is faster than long term average (Fig. 2).  

Figure 1.  Predicted pea leaf weevil phenology at Saskatoon SK.
Values are based on model simulations for April 1 – June 24, 2018.
Figure 2.  Predicted pea leaf weevil phenology at Saskatoon SK.
Values are based on model simulations for Long Term Climate Normals (LTCN).

Pea leaf weevil larvae develop under the soil over a period of 30 to 60 days. They are “C” shaped with a dark brown head capsule. The rest of the body is a milky-white color (Fig. 3 A). Larvae develop through five instar stages. In the 5th instar, larvae range in length from 3.5 – 5.5 mm. First instar larvae bury into the soil after hatching, and search out root nodules on field pea and faba bean plants. Larvae enter and consume the microbial contents of the root nodules (Fig. 3 B). These root nodules are responsible for nitrogen-fixation, thus pea leaf weevil larval feeding can affect plant yield and the plant’s ability to input nitrogen into the soil. 

Figure 3.  Pea leaf weevil larva in soil (A) and field pea root nodules damaged by larval feeding (B).  Photos: L. Dosdall).

Biological and monitoring information related to pea leaf weevil in field crops is posted by the province of Alberta and in the PPMN monitoring protocol.

Also refer to the pea leaf weevil page within the “Field Crop and Forage Pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada: Identification and management field guide” – both English-enhanced or French-enhanced versions are available.  A review of this insect was published in 2011 in Prairie Soils and Crops by Carcamo and Vankosky.

Pea leaf weevil

Pea Leaf Weevil (Sitona lineatus– The PLW model predicted that larvae should be appearing in fields near Saskatoon (Fig. 1). Development in 2018 is faster than that predicted using long term averages  (LTCN presented in Fig. 2).  

Figure 1.  Predicted pea leaf weevil phenology at Saskatoon SK.
Values are based on model simulations for April 1 – June 18, 2018.
Figure 2.  Predicted pea leaf weevil phenology at Saskatoon SK. 
Values are based on model simulations for April 1 – June 18, 2018. using Long Term Climate Normals.



Larvae develop under the soil over a period of 30 to 60 days. They are “C” shaped with a dark brown head capsule. The rest of the body is a milky-white color (Fig. 3 A). Larvae develop through five instar stages. In the 5th instar, larvae range in length from 3.5 – 5.5 mm. First instar larvae bury into the soil after hatching, and search out root nodules on field pea and faba bean plants. Larvae enter and consume the microbial contents of the root nodules (Fig. 3 B). These root nodules are responsible for nitrogen-fixation, thus pea leaf weevil larval feeding can affect plant yield and the plant’s ability to input nitrogen into the soil. 

Figure 3.  Pea leaf weevil larva in soil (A) and field pea root nodules damaged by larval feeding (B).  Photos: L. Dosdall).

Biological and monitoring information related to pea leaf weevil in field crops is posted by the province of Alberta and in the PPMN monitoring protocol.

Also refer to the pea leaf weevil page within the “Field Crop and Forage Pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada: Identification and management field guide” – both English-enhanced or French-enhanced versions are available.  A review of this insect was published in 2011 in Prairie Soils and Crops by Carcamo and Vankosky.

Wireworm distribution map

Reminder – Last week turned out to be our wireworm blitz!  This complicated group of insect species was featured in the Insect of the Week AND we include the survey results again this week!

The following maps summarize the main results of a survey of pest species of wireworms of the Canadian Prairie Provinces.  Samples (both larvae and beetles) were submitted to Dr. Bob Vernon’s lab in Agassiz, BC, from 2004 to 2017, and identified by Dr. Wim van Herk (Fig. 1).  Species identifications were confirmed with barcoding.

Figure 1.  Sampling locations for click beetles and wireworm larvae (Coleoptera: Elateridae) submitted for wireworm surveying from 2004-2017.

Approximately 600 samples were submitted, with the number of larvae per sample typically less than five (Fig. 1).  More samples are welcome, particularly from areas currently not well represented on the maps.  Please provide either the legal land description or latitude and longitude coordinates with a sample.  Any information on the cropping history or whether fields were irrigated is helpful.

Review the complete survey summary posted in Week 05 (for Jun 7, 2018).

Disclaimer: 
Please do not distribute or use the contents of this post, including any maps, without obtaining prior permission.

Obtain further information or arrange shipment of wireworm or click beetle samples by contacting:
Dr. Wim van Herk
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Agassiz Research and Development Centre
6947 Highway 7, Agassiz, BC, V0M 1A0
wim.vanherk@agr.gc.ca

Pea leaf weevil

Pea Leaf Weevil (Sitona lineatus– The PLW model predicts that oviposition is nearly complete and PLW are primarily in the adult and egg stages (Fig. 1). Larvae should begin to appear later this week. 

Figure 1.  Predicted pea leaf weevil phenology at Red Deer AB.
Values are based on model simulations, for April 1-May 28, 2018 (projected to July 15, 2018).

Pea leaf weevils emerge in the spring primarily by flying (at temperatures above 17ºC) or they may walk short distances. Pea leaf weevil movement into peas and faba beans is achieved primarily through flight.  Adults are slender, greyish-brown measuring approximately 5 mm in length (view weevil adult photos here).


Adults feed upon the leaf margins and growing points of legume seedlings (alfalfa, clover, dry beans, faba beans, peas) and produce a characteristic, scalloped (notched) edge (Fig. 4).  Females lay 1000 to 1500 eggs in the soil either near or on developing pea or faba bean plants from May to June.


Figure 4.  Scalloped notching along leaf margins of pea plant (Photo: L. Dosdall).

Larvae develop under the soil over a period of 30 to 60 days. They are “C” shaped with a dark brown head capsule. The rest of the body is a milky-white color (Fig. 5 A). Larvae develop through five instar stages. In the 5th instar, larvae range in length from 3.5 – 5.5 mm. First instar larvae bury into the soil after hatching, and search out root nodules on field pea and faba bean plants. Larvae enter and consume the microbial contents of the root nodules (Fig. 5 B). These root nodules are responsible for nitrogen-fixation, thus pea leaf weevil larval feeding can affect plant yield and the plant’s ability to input nitrogen into the soil. 

Figure 5.  Pea leaf weevil larva in soil (A) and field pea root nodules damaged by larval feeding (B).  Photos: L. Dosdall).

Biological and monitoring information related to pea leaf weevil in field crops is posted by the province of Alberta and in the PPMN monitoring protocol.

Also refer to the pea leaf weevil page within the “Field Crop and Forage Pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada: Identification and management field guide” – both English-enhanced or French-enhanced versions are available.  A review of this insect was published in 2011 in Prairie Soils and Crops by Carcamo and Vankosky.

Wireworm distribution map

The following maps summarize the main results of a survey of pest species of wireworms of the Canadian Prairie Provinces.  Samples (both larvae and beetles) were submitted to Dr. Bob Vernon’s lab in Agassiz, BC, from 2004 to 2017, and identified by Dr. Wim van Herk (Fig. 1).  Species identifications were confirmed with barcoding.

Figure 1.  Sampling locations for click beetles and wireworm larvae (Coleoptera: Elateridae) submitted for wireworm surveying from 2004-2017.

Approximately 600 samples were submitted, with the number of larvae per sample typically less than five (Fig. 1).  More samples are welcome, particularly from areas currently not well represented on the maps.  Please provide either the legal land description or latitude and longitude coordinates with a sample.  Any information on the cropping history or whether fields were irrigated is helpful.

The main findings of this survey are that:
1. Wireworms are re-emerging as primary pests of cereals and other crops, particularly in southern Alberta and Saskatchewan.  This can be attributed to several factors, including changes in seeding and cultivation resulting in higher soil moisture and increased food availability, and therefore greater wireworm survival; the elimination of effective insecticides such as lindane and the decline of organochlorine residues in the soil; and the present lack of insecticides that actually kill wireworms.

2. Limonius californicus is generally the predominant pest species in fields reporting heavy wireworm damage, occasionally building up to very high populations and resulting in complete crop wrecks (Fig. 2).  This was not the case when Glen et al. (1943) or Doane (1977) conducted their surveys; L. californicus was considered a minor species at those times.  Selatosomus destructor (Fig. 3) and Hypnoidus bicolor (Fig. 4) are still the most common species.  The pest status of another commonly found species, the predaceous Aeolus mellillus (Fig. 5), is unclear.  The following species listed by Glen et al. (1943) as pests of agriculture in the Prairie Provinces were found also, but infrequently: Agriotes mancusA. criddleiA. stabilisHemicrepidius memnoniusL. pectoralis, and various Dalopius sp.

Figure 2.  Distribution of Limonius californicus (Coleoptera: Elateridae) submitted for
wireworm surveying from 2004-2017.
Figure 3.  Distribution of Selatosomus destructor (Coleoptera: Elateridae) submitted for
wireworm surveying from 2004-2017.
Figure 4.  Distribution of Hypniodes bicolor (Coleoptera: Elateridae) submitted for
wireworm surveying from 2004-2017.
Figure 5. Distribution of Aeolus mellillus (Coleoptera: Elateridae) submitted for
wireworm surveying from 2004-2017.

3. Multiple pest species are frequently found in the same fields where damage is reported (i.e. about 25% of the time, despite the small number of larvae per sample).  This is particularly important as pest species can vary considerably in the type of damage they cause (e.g. it remains unclear if H. bicolor is damaging to potato), their life history (e.g. duration of the larval stage), and susceptibility to insecticides.

Details related to the biology and management of these species are reviewed in van Herk and Vernon (2014) and Vernon and van Herk (2013).

Acknowledgements:
These maps are only possible thanks to the collections done by a large team of local entomologists and agrologists.  We are extremely grateful to them; thank you to everyone who participated!  A special thank you to Ted Labun and colleagues at Syngenta Crop Protection (Canada), and to Bayer CropScience, for providing the bulk of the samples. 

Disclaimer: 
Please do not distribute or use the contents of this post, including any maps, without obtaining prior permission.

Obtain further information or arrange shipment of wireworm or click beetle samples by contacting:
Dr. Wim van Herk
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Agassiz Research and Development Centre
6947 Highway 7, Agassiz, BC, V0M 1A0
wim.vanherk@agr.gc.ca

Further wireworm reading:
Burrage RH (1964) Trends in damage by wireworms (Coleoptera: Elateridae) in grain crops in Saskatchewan, 1954–1961. Canadian Journal of Plant Science, 44: 515–519.  https://doi.org/10.4141/cjps64-102 


Doane JF (1977) Spatial pattern and density of Ctenicera destructor and Hypolithus bicolor (Coleoptera: Elateridae) in soil in spring wheat. The Canadian Entomologist 109: 807–822. https://doi.org/10.4039/Ent109807-6


Doane JF (1977) The flat wireworm, Aeolus mellillus: studies on seasonal occurrence of adults and incidence of the larvae in the wireworm complex attacking wheat in Saskatchewan. Environmental Entomology 6: 818–822. https://doi.org/10.1093/ee/6.6.818 


Glen R, King KM, Arnason AP (1943) The identification of wireworms of economic importance in Canada. Canadian Journal of Research 21: 358-387. https://doi.org/10.1139/cjr43d-030


van Herk WG, Vernon RS (2014) Click beetles and wireworms (Coleoptera: Elateridae) of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba.  In: Arthropods of Canadian Grasslands (Volume 4): Biodiversity and Systematics Part 2. (Edited by D.J. Giberson and H.A. Carcamo).  Biological Survey of Canada, pp. 87-117. https://biologicalsurvey.ca/monographs/read/17


Vernon RS, van Herk WG (2013) Wireworms as pests of potato. In: Insect pests of potato: Global perspectives on biology and management.  (Edited by P. Giordanengo, C. Vincent, A. Alyokhin).  Academic Press, Elsevier, Amsterdam, pp 103–164.  https://www.elsevier.com/books/insect-pests-of-potato/alyokhin/978-0-12-386895-4 


Zacharuk RY (1962) Distribution, habits, and development of Ctenicera destructor (Brown) in western Canada, with notes on the related species C. aeripennis (Kby.) (Coleoptera: Elateridae). Canadian Journal of Zoology 40: 539–552.  https://doi.org/10.1139/z62-046

Pea leaf weevil

Pea Leaf Weevil (Sitona lineatus– The PLW model predicts that oviposition is occurring across southern and central regions of the prairies (example Red Deer (Fig. 9). 

Figure 1.  Predicted pea leaf weevil phenology at Red Deer AB. 
Values are based on model simulations, for April 1-May 28, 2018 (projected to July 15, 2018).

Pea leaf weevils emerge in the spring primarily by flying (at temperatures above 17ºC) or they may walk short distances. Pea leaf weevil movement into peas and faba beans is achieved primarily through flight.  Adults are slender, greyish-brown measuring approximately 5 mm in length (Fig. 2, Left).  

The pea leaf weevil resembles the sweet clover weevil (Sitona cylindricollis) but the former is distinguished by three light-coloured stripes extending length-wise down thorax and sometimes the abdomen.  All species of Sitona, including the pea leaf weevil, have a short snout.  


Figure 2.  Comparison images and descriptions of four Sitona species adults including pea leaf weevil (Left).


Adults will feed upon the leaf margins and growing points of legume seedlings (alfalfa, clover, dry beans, faba beans, peas) and produce a characteristic, scalloped (notched) edge.  Females lay 1000 to 1500 eggs in the soil either near or on developing pea or faba bean plants from May to June.


Reminder – The 2017 risk map for pea leaf weevils was released in March 2018.  The map is based on the number of feeding notches observed in peas (Fig. 3).  

Figure 3. Estimates of pea leaf weevil (S. lineatus) densities based on feeding notches observed in
peas grown in Alberta and Saskatchewan in 2017.

Biological and monitoring information related to pea leaf weevil in field crops is posted by the province of Alberta and in the PPMN monitoring protocol.

Also refer to the pea leaf weevil page within the “Field Crop and Forage Pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada: Identification and management field guide” – both English-enhanced or French-enhanced versions are available.  A review of this insect was published in 2011 in Prairie Soils and Crops by Carcamo and Vankosky.

Pea leaf weevil

Pea Leaf Weevil (Sitona lineatus– The PLW model predicts that oviposition is occurring across southern and central regions of the prairies (example Swift Current – Fig. 1). 

Figure 1.  Predicted pea leaf weevil phenology at Swift Current SK.
Values are based on model simulations (April 1-May 28, 2018 and projected to July 1, 2018).



Pea leaf weevils emerge in the spring primarily by flying (at temperatures above 17ºC) or they may walk short distances. Pea leaf weevil movement into peas and faba beans is achieved primarily through flight.  Adults are slender, greyish-brown measuring approximately 5 mm in length (Fig. 2, Left).  

The pea leaf weevil resembles the sweet clover weevil (Sitona cylindricollis) but the former is distinguished by three light-coloured stripes extending length-wise down thorax and sometimes the abdomen.  All species of Sitona, including the pea leaf weevil, have a short snout.  


Figure 2.  Comparison images and descriptions of four Sitona species adults including pea leaf weevil (Left).


Adults will feed upon the leaf margins and growing points of legume seedlings (alfalfa, clover, dry beans, faba beans, peas) and produce a characteristic, scalloped (notched) edge.  Females lay 1000 to 1500 eggs in the soil either near or on developing pea or faba bean plants from May to June.


Reminder – The 2017 risk map for pea leaf weevils was released in March 2018.  The map is based on the number of feeding notches observed in peas (Fig. 3).  

Figure 3. Estimates of pea leaf weevil (S. lineatus) densities based on feeding notches observed in
peas grown in Alberta and Saskatchewan in 2017.

Biological and monitoring information related to pea leaf weevil in field crops is posted by the province of Alberta and in the PPMN monitoring protocol.

Also refer to the pea leaf weevil page within the “Field Crop and Forage Pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada: Identification and management field guide” – both English-enhanced or French-enhanced versions are available.  A review of this insect was published in 2011 in Prairie Soils and Crops by Carcamo and Vankosky.

Pea leaf weevil

Pea Leaf Weevil (Sitona lineatus– The PLW model predicts that adult weevils should be out and that oviposition may be occurring in fields with emerging peas.  An example of PLW predicted phenology for Swift Current SK is presented in Figure 1. 

Figure 1. Predicted PLW phenology at Swift Current, SK. Values are based on model simulations,
for April 1 – May 21, 2018 (projected to July 1, 2018).



Pea leaf weevils emerge in the spring primarily by flying (at temperatures above 17ºC) or they may walk short distances. Pea leaf weevil movement into peas and faba beans is achieved primarily through flight.  Adults are slender, greyish-brown measuring approximately 5 mm in length (Fig. 2, Left).  

The pea leaf weevil resembles the sweet clover weevil (Sitona cylindricollis) but the former is distinguished by three light-coloured stripes extending length-wise down thorax and sometimes the abdomen.  All species of Sitona, including the pea leaf weevil, have a short snout.  


Figure 2.  Comparison images and descriptions of four Sitona species adults including pea leaf weevil (Left).


Adults will feed upon the leaf margins and growing points of legume seedlings (alfalfa, clover, dry beans, faba beans, peas) and produce a characteristic, scalloped (notched) edge.  Females lay 1000 to 1500 eggs in the soil either near or on developing pea or faba bean plants from May to June.


Reminder – The 2017 risk map for pea leaf weevils was released in March 2018.  The map is based on the number of feeding notches observed in peas (Fig. 3).  

Figure 3. Estimates of pea leaf weevil (S. lineatus) densities based on feeding notches observed in
peas grown in Alberta and Saskatchewan in 2017.

Biological and monitoring information related to pea leaf weevil in field crops is posted by the province of Alberta and in the PPMN monitoring protocol.

Also refer to the pea leaf weevil page within the “Field Crop and Forage Pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada: Identification and management field guide” – both English-enhanced or French-enhanced versions are available.  A review of this insect was published in 2011 in Prairie Soils and Crops by Carcamo and Vankosky.

Pea leaf weevil

Pea Leaf Weevil (Sitona lineatus– The PLW model predicts that adults are beginning to fly. This is similar to model output based on long term (climate) data.  Model output estimates that oviposition should begin in late May or early June (Fig. 1).

Figure 1. Predicted PLW phenology at Swift Current based on long term climate data.
Values are based on model simulations (April 1 – May 6).

Pea leaf weevils emerge in the spring primarily by flying (at temperatures above 17ºC) or they may walk short distances. Pea leaf weevil movement into peas and faba beans is achieved primarily through flight.  Adults are slender, greyish-brown measuring approximately 5 mm in length (Fig. 2, Left).  

The pea leaf weevil resembles the sweet clover weevil (Sitona cylindricollis) but the former is distinguished by three light-coloured stripes extending length-wise down thorax and sometimes the abdomen.  All species of Sitona, including the pea leaf weevil, have a short snout.  


Figure 2.  Comparison images and descriptions of four Sitona species adults including pea leaf weevil (Left).


Adults will feed upon the leaf margins and growing points of legume seedlings (alfalfa, clover, dry beans, faba beans, peas) and produce a characteristic, scalloped (notched) edge.  Females lay 1000 to 1500 eggs in the soil either near or on developing pea or faba bean plants from May to June.



Reminder – The 2017 risk map for pea leaf weevils was released in March 2018.  The map is based on the number of feeding notches observed in peas (Fig. 3).  

Figure 3. Estimates of pea leaf weevil (S. lineatus) densities based on feeding notches observed in
peas grown in Alberta and Saskatchewan in 2017.

Biological and monitoring information related to pea leaf weevil in field crops is posted by the province of Alberta and in the PPMN monitoring protocol.

Also refer to the pea leaf weevil page within the “Field Crop and Forage Pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada: Identification and management field guide” – both English-enhanced or French-enhanced versions are available.  A review of this insect was published in 2011 in Prairie Soils and Crops by Carcamo and Vankosky.

Pea leaf weevil

Pea Leaf Weevil (Sitona lineatus– The PLW model predicts that adults are emerging from overwintering sites and beginning to fly. This is similar to model output based on long term (climate) data.  Looking forward, based on long term average climate data, oviposition should occur in late May or early June (Fig. 1).

Figure 1. Predicted PLW phenology at Swift Current based on long term climate data. Values are
based on model simulations (April 1 – May 6).

Pea leaf weevils emerge in the spring primarily by flying (at temperatures above 17ºC) or they may walk short distances. Pea leaf weevil movement into peas and faba beans is achieved primarily through flight.  Adults are slender, greyish-brown measuring approximately 5 mm in length (Fig. 1, Left).  

The pea leaf weevil resembles the sweet clover weevil (Sitona cylindricollis) but the former is distinguished by three light-coloured stripes extending length-wise down thorax and sometimes the abdomen.  All species of Sitona, including the pea leaf weevil, have a short snout.  


Figure 1.  Comparison images and descriptions of four Sitona species adults including pea leaf weevil (Left).


Adults will feed upon the leaf margins and growing points of legume seedlings (alfalfa, clover, dry beans, faba beans, peas) and produce a characteristic, scalloped (notched) edge.  Females lay 1000 to 1500 eggs in the soil either near or on developing pea or faba bean plants from May to June.


Biological and monitoring information related to pea leaf weevil in field crops is posted by the province of Alberta and in the PPMN monitoring protocol.


Also refer to the pea leaf weevil page within the “Field Crop and Forage Pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada: Identification and management field guide” – both English-enhanced or French-enhanced versions are available.  A review of this insect was published in 2011 in Prairie Soils and Crops by Carcamo and Vankosky.

2017 Swede Midge Pheromone Monitoring Results

In 2017, swede midge pheromone traps were deployed at 46 sites across the Prairie region to monitor for populations of this brassica pest. Of the 46 trap sites, two were located in BC, 19 in Alberta, 16 in Saskatchewan, and nine in Manitoba. Figure 1 illustrates trap site locations in 2017. Two pheromone traps were deployed at each site.


All of the traps were negative for swede midge in 2017. 

Figure 1.  Pheromone trap site locations for swede midge (Continarinia nasturtii) in 2017.

We are grateful to all of the producers, agronomists, and cooperators who participated in the 2017 swede midge monitoring project. Without your assistance, we could not have supported such a thorough and widespread pheromone monitoring program.


We also extend our thanks to Nancy Melnychuk (AAFC-Saskatoon) for organizing the program and distributing trapping materials, and to Jonathon Williams and Shane Hladun (AAFC-Saskatoon) for examining the returned sticky cards.


Because of the serious threat that swede midge poses to canola production, it is vital that monitoring continues across the Prairies. At this time, plans are being made for the 2018 swede midge monitoring program. Agrologists or growers interested in performing weekly monitoring in 2018 are encouraged to contact Jonathon Williams, Boyd Mori, or Meghan Vankosky for more information.


Boyd Mori and Meghan Vankosky
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Saskatoon Research and Development Centre


More information about swede midge can be found by:

• Referring to the Canola Watch article by Dr. Julie Soroka or accessing a new Ontario fact sheet produced by Baute et al. 2016.
• Accessing the swede midge pages within the new Field Guide which is available as a free download in either English or French.


Weekly Update – Pea leaf weevil

Pea Leaf Weevil (Sitona lineatus– Oviposition is predicted to have peaked across central and southern regions of Alberta and Saskatchewan.  Hatch should be underway in pea fields near Lethbridge while hatching is predicted to occur this week near Saskatoon. 

Biological and monitoring information related to pea leaf weevil in field crops is posted by the province of Alberta and a NEWLY UPDATED PPMN monitoring protocol is available!

Also refer to the pea leaf weevil page within the “Field Crop and Forage Pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada: Identification and management field guide” – both English-enhanced or French-enhanced versions are available.  A review of this insect was published in 2011 in Prairie Soils and Crops by Carcamo and Vankosky.

Weekly Update – Pea leaf weevil

Pea Leaf Weevil (Sitona lineatus– This week, weevil oviposition is predicted to be occurring across central and southern regions of Alberta and Saskatchewan.   











The PLW Blitz continues this week and features:
– The Insect of the Week from June 1st, 
– A NEWLY UPDATED Monitoring Protocol (Vankosky et al. 2017), AND
– The current Insect of the Week features a group of beetles recognized as general predators but one species is an egg predator associated with Pea leaf weevil.



Remember – Pea leaf weevils emerge in the spring primarily by flying (at temperatures above 17ºC) or they may walk short distances. Pea leaf weevil movement into peas and faba beans is achieved primarily through flight.  Adults are slender, greyish-brown measuring approximately 5 mm in length (Fig. 3, Left).  


The pea leaf weevil resembles the sweet clover weevil (Sitona cylindricollis) but the former is distinguished by three light-coloured stripes extending length-wise down thorax and sometimes the abdomen.  All species of Sitona, including the pea leaf weevil, have a short snout.  



Figure 3.  Comparison images and descriptions of four Sitona species adults including pea leaf weevil (Left).


Adults feed upon the leaf margins and growing points of legume seedlings (alfalfa, clover, dry beans, faba beans, peas) and produce a characteristic, scalloped (notched) edge (Fig. 4).  Females lay 1000 to 1500 eggs in the soil either near or on developing pea or faba bean plants from May to June.


Figure 4.  Scalloped notching along leaf margins of pea plant (Photo: L. Dosdall).




Biological and monitoring information related to pea leaf weevil in field crops is posted by the province of Alberta and a NEWLY UPDATED PPMN monitoring protocol is available!

Also refer to the pea leaf weevil page within the “Field Crop and Forage Pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada: Identification and management field guide” – both English-enhanced or French-enhanced versions are available.  A review of this insect was published in 2011 in Prairie Soils and Crops by Carcamo and Vankosky.

Weekly Update – Pea leaf weevil

Pea Leaf Weevil (Sitona lineatus– This week is our PLW Blitz featuring this pest with:
  -The Insect of the Week
  -Updated model outputs and phenological predictions for 2017 (as of May 29, 2017), and 
  – A NEWLY UPDATED Monitoring Protocol (Vankosky et al. 2017)!


The PLW model was run for Lethbridge AB and Saskatoon SK. Current weather data was used then extended by Long Term Normal climate data (May 30-Jun 30) in order to predict pea leaf weevil phenology.  Compared to last week, model output indicated that oviposition has been delayed by ~5-7 days.  As of May 29th, phenologies for eggs and larvae were predicted to be similar for both locations (Fig. 1-2)

Figure 1. Pea leaf weevil model predicting phenology for 2017 near Saskatoon SK.


Figure 2. Pea leaf weevil model predicting phenology for 2017 near Lethbridge AB.





Pea leaf weevils emerge in the spring primarily by flying (at temperatures above 17ºC) or they may walk short distances. Pea leaf weevil movement into peas and faba beans is achieved primarily through flight.  Adults are slender, greyish-brown measuring approximately 5 mm in length (Fig. 3, Left).  

The pea leaf weevil resembles the sweet clover weevil (Sitona cylindricollis) but the former is distinguished by three light-coloured stripes extending length-wise down thorax and sometimes the abdomen.  All species of Sitona, including the pea leaf weevil, have a short snout.  


Figure 3.  Comparison images and descriptions of four Sitona species adults including pea leaf weevil (Left).


Adults will feed upon the leaf margins and growing points of legume seedlings (alfalfa, clover, dry beans, faba beans, peas) and produce a characteristic, scalloped (notched) edge.  Females lay 1000 to 1500 eggs in the soil either near or on developing pea or faba bean plants from May to June.


Biological and monitoring information related to pea leaf weevil in field crops is posted by the province of Alberta and a NEWLY UPDATED PPMN monitoring protocol is available!


Also refer to the pea leaf weevil page within the “Field Crop and Forage Pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada: Identification and management field guide” – both English-enhanced or French-enhanced versions are available.  A review of this insect was published in 2011 in Prairie Soils and Crops by Carcamo and Vankosky.


Weekly Update – Pea leaf weevil

Pea Leaf Weevil (Sitona lineatus– The pea leaf weevil simulation model will be used to monitor weevil development across the prairies. Weekly temperature data collected across the prairies is incorporated into the simulation model which calculates estimates of weevil development stages based on biological parameters for Sitona lineatus.


The PLW model was run for Lethbridge AB and Saskatoon SK. Meteorological data (April 1 – May 15, 2017) and climate data (May 16- June 30) were used to predict PLW phenology.  Output indicates that PLW oviposition in Lethbridge is approximately one week earlier than Saskatoon.  Reminder – Access last week’s PLW model output predictions here.

Pea leaf weevils emerge in the spring primarily by flying (at temperatures above 17ºC) or they may walk short distances. Pea leaf weevil movement into peas and faba beans is achieved primarily through flight.  Adults are slender, greyish-brown measuring approximately 5 mm in length (Fig. 1, Left).  

The pea leaf weevil resembles the sweet clover weevil (Sitona cylindricollis) but the former is distinguished by three light-coloured stripes extending length-wise down thorax and sometimes the abdomen.  All species of Sitona, including the pea leaf weevil, have a short snout.  


Figure 3.  Comparison images and descriptions of four Sitona species adults including pea leaf weevil (Left).


Adults will feed upon the leaf margins and growing points of legume seedlings (alfalfa, clover, dry beans, faba beans, peas) and produce a characteristic, scalloped (notched) edge.  Females lay 1000 to 1500 eggs in the soil either near or on developing pea or faba bean plants from May to June.


Biological and monitoring information related to pea leaf weevil in field crops is posted by the province of Alberta.  Also refer to the pea leaf weevil page within the “Field Crop and Forage Pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada: Identification and management field guide” – both English-enhanced or French-enhanced versions are available.  A review of this insect was published in 2011 in Prairie Soils and Crops by Carcamo and Vankosky.

Weekly Update – Pea leaf weevil

Pea Leaf Weevil (Sitona lineatus– The pea leaf weevil simulation model will be used to monitor weevil development across the prairies. Weekly temperature data collected across the prairies is incorporated into the simulation model which calculates estimates of weevil development stages based on biological parameters for Sitona lineatus.


Model output predicted that flight of pea leaf weevil adults was significantly earlier in Lethbridge than Saskatoon in 2017.  In the figure below, note the red line predicting adults emerging from overwintering then the yellow line predicting overwintered adults taking flight this spring for Lethbridge AB (Fig. 1, Upper) and Saskatoon SK (Fig. 1, Lower).





Figure 1.  Model output predicting development of pea leaf weevil in Lethbridge AB (Upper) and Saskaton SK (Lower) in the spring of 2017.




Reminder – In 2016, the distribution of pea leaf weevil increased dramatically based on both damage assessments AND collection of adults in 2016 (Fig. 2).

Figure 2. Distribution of pea leaf weevil (Sitona lineatus) based on surveying conducted in 2016 (Olfert et al. 2017).




Pea leaf weevils emerge in the spring primarily by flying (at temperatures above 17ºC) or they may walk short distances. Pea leaf weevil movement into peas and faba beans is achieved primarily through flight.  Adults are slender, greyish-brown measuring approximately 5 mm in length (Fig. 3, Left).  


The pea leaf weevil resembles the sweet clover weevil (Sitona cylindricollis) but the former is distinguished by three light-coloured stripes extending length-wise down thorax and sometimes the abdomen.  All species of Sitona, including the pea leaf weevil, have a short snout.  



Figure 3.  Comparison images and descriptions of four Sitona species adults including pea leaf weevil (Left).


Adults will feed upon the leaf margins and growing points of legume seedlings (alfalfa, clover, dry beans, faba beans, peas) and produce a characteristic, scalloped (notched) edge.  Females lay 1000 to 1500 eggs in the soil either near or on developing pea or faba bean plants from May to June.


Biological and monitoring information related to pea leaf weevil in field crops is posted by the province of Alberta.  Also refer to the pea leaf weevil page within the “Field Crop and Forage Pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada: Identification and management field guide” – both English-enhanced or French-enhanced versions are available.  A review of this insect was published in 2011 in Prairie Soils and Crops by Carcamo and Vankosky.

Weekly Update – Pea leaf weevil

Pea Leaf Weevil (Sitona lineatus– This species was one of the “big” insects of 2016’s field crop growing season.  The distribution of pea leaf weevil increased dramatically based on both damage assessments AND collection of adults in 2016 (Fig. 1) compared to previous years (Fig. 2).

Figure 1. Distribution of pea leaf weevil (Sitona lineatus) based on surveying conducted in 2016 (Olfert et al. 2017).


Figure 2.  Distributions of pea leaf weevil based on surveying conducted between 2012-2015 (Olfert et al. 2017).



Pea leaf weevils emerge in the spring primarily by flying (at temperatures above 17ºC) or they may walk short distances. Pea leaf weevil movement into peas and faba beans is achieved primarily through flight.  Adults are slender, greyish-brown measuring approximately 5 mm in length (Fig. 3, Left).  

The pea leaf weevil resembles the sweet clover weevil (Sitona cylindricollis) but the former is distinguished by three light-coloured stripes extending length-wise down thorax and sometimes the abdomen.  All species of Sitona, including the pea leaf weevil, have a short snout.  

Figure 3.  Comparison images and descriptions of four Sitona species adults including pea leaf weevil (Left).


Adults will feed upon the leaf margins and growing points of legume seedlings (alfalfa, clover, dry beans, faba beans, peas) and produce a characteristic, scalloped (notched) edge.  Females lay 1000 to 1500 eggs in the soil either near or on developing pea or faba bean plants from May to June.


Biological and monitoring information related to pea leaf weevil in field crops is posted by the province of Alberta.  Also refer to the pea leaf weevil page within the “Field Crop and Forage Pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada: Identification and management field guide” – both English-enhanced or French-enhanced versions are available.  A review of this insect was published in 2011 in Prairie Soils and Crops by Carcamo and Vankosky.

New insect species found in canola flowers in Saskatchewan and Alberta

Researchers at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s Saskatoon Research and Development Centre (SRDC), along with colleagues at the University of Guelph, Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency found a new insect damaging canola in northeastern Saskatchewan and east-central Alberta. The new species, a midge, which has yet to be named and scientifically described, belongs to the genus Contarinia. It is similar in appearance to the swede midge, Contarinia nasturtii, commonly found in Ontario.

Currently, the only confirmed symptom of damage by this insect are “bottle”-shaped galled flowers that form as a result of larval feeding inside flowers. Damaged flowers do not produce pods or seeds.

How the new species was confirmed
For years there have been accounts of differences between swede midge populations in Saskatchewan and Ontario, including adult size, the number of generations per year, and the type and amount of damage reported. These hints, combined with extremely low capture rates of adult swede midge in pheromone-baited traps in Saskatchewan despite apparently high rates of adult swede midge emergence caught the attention of Dr. Boyd Mori, a trained chemical ecologist and new research scientist at the SRDC.

Dr. Mori collected adult midges from soil emergence cages and reared larvae found in infested flowers. The resulting adult midges were sent to preeminent North American swede midge researchers at the University of Guelph, Dr. Rebecca Hallett and James Heal who immediately noticed differences between the midge from Saskatchewan and swede midges from Ontario: midges from Saskatchewan were more robust, had hairier wings and had slight differences in the antennae and genitalia compared to the swede midge.

These differences were confirmed by midge expert Dr. Bradley Sinclair with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency in Ottawa who also found several other physical differences. Using morphological differences, and DNA sequencing, the researchers concluded that the Saskatchewan midges were a separate species from the swede midge.

Economic Importance
While midge damage observed in Saskatchewan in 2016 appeared to be low in most fields, the economic impact of the new Contarinia midge is not known. Understanding pests and pest management is a priority of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and work is underway to formally describe and name this new species.

Questions? Contact Dr. Boyd Mori or Dr. Meghan Vankosky


Link here to access a brief bio for Dr. Boyd Mori and Dr. Meghan Vankosky.

2017 Wheat Midge Forecast Map for Alberta

Each fall, soil core sampling is carried out across the Canadian prairies to assess wheat midge densities and parasitism levels of the overwintering cocoon stage.  Soil collected from wheat fields is collected then the samples are washed to retrieve the tiny cocoons, each measuring only ~2-3mm in diameter (Fig. 1).




Figure 1. Wheat midge cocoon sizes (L) compared to canola seed (R).
After washing, each cocoon is carefully dissected under the microscope to determine if a parasitoid larva has attacked the wheat midge larval host.  The densities of the cocoons, and the percent parasitism by the biological control agents (Macroglenes penetrans, Platygaster sp., Euxestonotus error), are compiled and used to generate the geospatial forecast map below.  

The Albertan 2017 wheat midge forecast is posted below (Fig. 2) and you can review previous maps for that province further down the page.  Be sure to review Alberta Agriculture & Forestry’s full wheat midge forecast map posting and how they conduct their survey by linking here.


Figure 2.  Alberta wheat midge forecast map for 2017.






Additional information related to wheat midge biology and monitoring can be accessed by linking to your provincial fact sheet (Saskatchewan Agriculture or Alberta Agriculture & Forestry).  A review of wheat midge on the Canadian prairies was published by Elliott, Olfert, and Hartley in 2011.


More information about Wheat midge can be found by accessing the pages from the new “Field Crop and Forage Pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada: Identification and Field Guide”.  View ONLY the Wheat midge pages but remember the guide is available as a free downloadable document as both an English-enhanced or French-enhanced version.

2016 Swede Midge Pheromone Monitoring

In 2016, swede midge pheromone traps were deployed at 62 sites across the Prairie region to monitor adult populations of this brassica pest. Of the 62 trap sites, two were located in BC, 13 in Alberta, 29 in Saskatchewan (where positive swede midge identifications were made in 2007 and 2009), and 13 in Manitoba. The map below illustrates trap site locations in 2016.


None of the traps were positive for swede midge in 2016. 







We are grateful to all of the producers, agronomists, and cooperators who participated in the 2016 swede midge monitoring project. Without your assistance, we could not have supported such a thorough and widespread pheromone monitoring program. 



We also extend our thanks to Nancy Melnychuk (AAFC-Saskatoon) for organizing the program, distributing trapping materials, and processing returned sticky cards for adult swede midge.



Because of the serious threat that swede midge poses to canola production, it is vital that monitoring for swede midge continues across the Prairies. At this time, plans are being made for the 2017 swede midge monitoring program. Agrologists or growers interested in performing weekly monitoring in 2017 are encouraged to email either your provincial entomologist or the survey researchers hyperlinked below for more information.



Owen Olfert (AAFC-Saskatoon) 

Boyd Mori (AAFC-Saskatoon) 
Meghan Vankosky (AAFC-Saskatoon) 


John Gavloski (Manitoba Agriculture) 
Scott Hartley (Saskatchewan Agriculture) 
Scott Meers (Alberta Agriculture & Forestry) 

More information about swede midge can be found by:
• Referring to the Canola Watch article by Dr. Julie Soroka or accessing a new Ontario fact sheet produced by Baute et al. 2016.
• Accessing the swede midge pages within the new Field Guide which is available as a free download in either English or French.

2016 Canola Midge Surveying in Alberta

This summer, Alberta Agriculture & Forestry Staff performed a survey of 42 canola sites in central Alberta on July 20, 21, 25, and 26 of 2016 and detected larvae within flower buds at multiple sites but ALWAYS AT LOW DENSITIES.  


At each site, buds on canola plants were assessed for typical bell damage then dissected either in the field or later in the laboratory to determine if midge larvae were present.  Results of the survey are described and mapped with the incidence of either:  
   1) buds with swede midge-type damage and containing larvae, or
   2) buds with swede midge-type damage but containing no larvae, or 
   3) no buds buds showing swede midge-type damage.
Review Alberta Agriculture & Forestry’s 2016 canola midge survey methods and map here.  A screenshot (retrieved 07Sep2016) is below for reference.





Watch for survey results from Saskatchewan!  The preliminary data indicates the distribution of midge in canola within Saskatchewan has increased in 2016 compared to 2015.


Find more swede midge information:
– Refer to the Canola Watch article by Dr. Julie Soroka or review the new Ontario fact sheet produced by Baute et al. 2016.  


– Review the previous Weekly Update post for swede midge from Week 16 in 2016. 


– Review the swede midge page from the new Field Guide.  A screen shot is included below for reference.





Access the above swede midge page within the new “Field Crop and Forage Pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada: Identification and management field guide” – both English-enhanced or French-enhanced versions are available for free – download them!

Weekly Update – Cutworms

Cutworms (Noctuidae) – Reminder – Keep an eye on fields that are “slow” to emerge, are missing rows, include wilting or yellowing plants, have bare patches, or appear highly attractive to birds – these are areas warranting a closer look.  Plan to follow-up by walking these areas later in the day when some cutworm species move above-ground to feed.  Start to dig below the soil surface (1-5 cm deep) near the base of a symptomatic plant or the adjacent healthy plant.  If the plant is well-established, check within the crown in addition to the adjacent soil.  The culprits could be wireworms or cutworms.  

Several species of cutworms  can be present in fields.  They range in colour from shiny opaque, to tan, to brownish-red with chevron patterning.  Cutworm biology, species information, plus monitoring recommendations are available in the Prairie Pest Monitoring Network’s Cutworm Monitoring Protocol.  Also refer to Manitoba Agriculture and Rural Initiatives cutworm fact sheet which includes action and economic thresholds for cutworms in several crops. 

More information about cutworms can be found by accessing the pages from the new “Field Crop and Forage Pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada: Identification and Field Guide”.  View an excerpt of ONLY the Cutworm pages from the new “Field Crop and Forage Pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada: Identification and management field guide”.  The guide is available as a free downloadable document as both an English-enhanced or French-enhanced version.


For Manitobans….Last week’s Insect Update includes great photos of dingy and redbacked cutworms plus monitoring tips which include how to discern these two species from one another.


For Saskatchewanians….Cutworms have been reported in several areas of the Province this spring. Affected crops include pea, lentil, barley and canola. If damage is significant and re-seeding is an option, seed first then spray an insecticide registered for cutworms in the applicable crop. Recommended economic thresholds for cutworms are:
   – 25 to 30 per cent stand reduction (canola)
   – 3 to 6 cutworms / square metre (wheat, barley, oats)
   – 2 to 3 cutworms / sq. metre (pea, lentil)
   – 4 to 5 / sq. metre (flax)

For Albertans….. Cutworms have been reported throughout the province the past week!  If you find cutworms, please consider using the Alberta Pest Surveillance Network’s “2016 Cutworm Reporting Tool”.  Once data entry occurs, your growers can view the live 2016 cutworm map.  A screen shot of the live map has been retrieved (01Jun2016) below for your reference and this week it includes additional reporting sites!




Weekly Update – Crop protection guide

Reminder – Crop Protection Guides – If you don’t have a copy of your province’s Crop Protection Guide, please make use of these links to access:

Weekly Update – Crop protection guide

Crop Protection Guides – If you don’t have a copy of your province’s Crop Protection Guide, please make use of these links to access:

Weekly Update – Crop reports

Crop reports are produced by:



International reports are produced by:

Weekly Update – Pea leaf weevil

Pea Leaf Weevil (Sitona lineatus) – Pea leaf weevils emerge in the spring primarily by flying (at temperatures above 17ºC) or they may walk short distances. Pea leaf weevil movement into peas and faba beans is achieved primarily through flight.  Adults are slender, greyish-brown measuring approximately 5 mm in length.  


The pea leaf weevil resembles the sweet clover weevil (Sitona cylindricollis) yet the former is distinguished by three light-coloured stripes extending length-wise down thorax and sometimes the abdomen (Access the Pea leaf weevil monitoring protocol).  All species of Sitona, including the pea leaf weevil, have a short snout.  



Adults will feed upon the leaf margins and growing points of legume seedlings (alfalfa, clover, dry beans, faba beans, peas) and produce a characteristic, scalloped (notched) edge.  Females lay 1000 to 1500 eggs in the soil either near or on developing pea or faba bean plants from May to June.


Information related to Pea leaf weevil in Alberta and the forecast for 2016 is posted here.  

2016 Cutworm Monitoring

Today Alberta Agriculture & Forestry posted the link to their online 2016 Cutworm reporting tool which is located at: http://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$Department/deptdocs.nsf/all/prm13779

Cutworm reports are mapped in real-time to help keep the agricultural industry informed.

Pea Leaf Weevil in Central Alberta

Previous reports and surveys performed by Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development’s Meers and Barkley confirmed the presence of Pea leaf weevil (Sitona lineatus) in the Red Deer region recently.

This week, faba bean plots at AAFC-Lacombe were observed to have suffered feeding damage from this introduced weevil species (note notching of leaves in photos below).  The damage was characterized by P. Reid as <10% foliage consumed which isn’t expected to affect yield according to H. Carcamo (AAFC-Lethbridge) who also posited that faba beans may tolerate more PLW feeding damage than peas owing to the fact that they produce more nodules and are recognized as the best nitrogen-fixing pulse crop.

***See Insect of the Week from June 1 for more information (description, damage, management options, etc) on the pea leaf weevil from the new Field Crop and Forage pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada***

Ongoing Monitoring Efforts for 2015

In 2014, the PPMN compiled data for the following sites highlighted in the map below.  The monitoring data collected from these sites forms invaluable sources of information both now and into the future.

Agricultural people from federal, provincial, regional and industry sectors all contribute to this tremendous effort!  Monitoring at sites like these below provides crucial information on insect pest risk before and during the growing season.  Some sites are visited annually while others are checked weekly and all that data enables the synthesis and generation of risk and forecast maps like those posted here.

THANK YOU to all who contribute!
Please contact Dr. Owen Olfert at AAFC-Saskatoon for more information about this map.