Weather synopsis

This past week (Aug 4-10, 2020) conditions were generally warm and dry. Weekly prairie temperatures were warmest across Manitoba and Saskatchewan (Fig. 1). Lower temperatures were observed across western and northwestern Alberta (Fig. 1). Though average 30-day (July 12 – August 10, 2020) temperatures continue to be cooler in Alberta than eastern Saskatchewan and Manitoba (Fig. 2), temperature anomalies (mean temperature difference from average; July 14-August 10, 2020) indicate that conditions have generally been warmer than average across most of Alberta as well as Parkland regions of Saskatchewan and Manitoba (Fig. 3).

Figure 1. Observed average temperatures across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (August 4-10, 2020).
Figure 2. Observed average temperatures across the Canadian prairies the past 30 days (July 12-August 10, 2020).
Figure 3. Mean temperature difference from Normal the past 30 days (July 14-August 12, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (12Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

Regions in southeastern central and southern Saskatchewan and across southern Manitoba have reported temperatures that have been up to 2 °C cooler than average. Based on growing season temperatures (April 1-August 10, 2020) temperatures were warmest across the southern prairies (Fig. 4). Based on growing season temperature deviations (observed temperatures compared with climate normal temperatures), below average temperatures have been observed across central and western regions of Saskatchewan and central regions of Alberta (Fig. 5). Across southern Alberta and most of Manitoba, temperatures have generally been above average. (Fig. 5)

Figure 4. Observed average temperatures across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-August 10, 2020).
Figure 5. Observed difference from average temperatures across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-August 10, 2020).

Most areas reported 7-day cumulative rainfall amounts that were less than 10 mm (Fig. 6). Cumulative 30-day rainfall was lowest across a large area ranging across southern Alberta as well as central and western regions of Saskatchewan (Fig. 7). Growing season rainfall (percent of average) is highly variable across the prairies (Fig. 8). Rainfall has been below normal across most of Saskatchewan as well as southern Alberta, and the Peace River region (Fig. 8).

Figure 6. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (August 4-10, 2020).
Figure 7. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past 30 days (July 12-August 10, 2020).
Figure 8. Percent of average precipitation for the growing season (April 1-August 10, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (12Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5 ºC, April 1-August 9, 2020) is below (Fig. 9) while the growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10 ºC, April 1-August 9, 2020) is shown in Figure 10.

Figure 9. Growing degree day map (Base 5 °C) observed across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-August 9, 2020).
Figure 10. Growing degree day map (Base 10 °C) observed across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-August 9, 2020).

The highest temperatures (°C) observed across the Canadian prairies the past seven days ranged from <17 to >34 °C (Fig. 11) while the lowest temperatures ranged from <-1 to >13 °C (Fig. 12). So far this growing season (as of August 12, 2020), the number of days above 25 °C ranges from 0-10 days in the west (to west of Calgary, west and north of central Alberta and extending into the south and west of the Peace River region) but extends up to 51-60 days in southern Manitoba (Fig. 13).

Figure 11. Highest temperatures (°C) observed across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (April 1-August 12, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (13Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209
Figure 12. Lowest temperatures (°C) observed across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (April 1-August 12, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (13Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209
Figure 13. Number of days above 25 °C observed across the Canadian prairies this growing season (April 1-August 12, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (13Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. Growers can bookmark the AAFC Current Conditions Drought Watch Maps for the growing season. Historical weather data can be access at the AAFC Drought Watch website, Environment Canada’s Historical Data website, or your provincial weather network.

Weather synopsis

This past week (July 28 to August 3, 2020) prairie temperatures were warmest in southeastern Alberta and southwestern Saskatchewan and coolest in southern Manitoba and the Peace River region of Alberta and British Columbia (Fig. 1). Temperatures in the past week represent a switch from previous weeks, where it was warmer in Manitoba than in Alberta. Average 30-day temperatures (July 5 to August 3, 2020) continue to be cooler across most of Alberta than observed in eastern Saskatchewan and Manitoba (Fig. 2). The average 30-day temperature at Winnipeg and Brandon continued to be greater than locations in Alberta and Saskatchewan (Fig. 2).

Figure 1. Observed average temperatures across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (July 28-August 3, 2020).
Figure 2. Observed average temperatures across the Canadian prairies the past 30 days (July 5-August 3, 2020).
Figure 3. Mean temperature difference from Normal the past 30 days (July 1-31, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (13Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

Cumulative rainfall for the past 7 days was lowest across southern regions of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba (Fig. 4). Cumulative 30-day rainfall was lowest across a large area ranging from southwest Saskatchewan to Saskatoon (Fig. 5). Growing season rainfall (percent of average) is below normal across eastern Saskatchewan and localized areas of Manitoba and above normal across most of Alberta (Fig. 6).

Figure 4. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (July 28-August 5, 2020).
Figure 5. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past 30 days (July 5-August 3, 2020).
Figure 6. Percent of average precipitation for the growing season (April 1-August 3, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (04Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5 ºC, April 1-August 3, 2020) is below (Fig. 7) while the growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10 ºC, April 1-August 3, 2020) is shown in Figure 8.

Figure 7. Growing degree day map (Base 5 °C) observed across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-August 3, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (06Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209
Figure 8. Growing degree day map (Base 10 °C) observed across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-August 3, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (06Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The highest temperatures (°C) observed across the Canadian prairies the past seven days ranged from <24 to >32 °C (Fig. 9). So far this growing season (as of August 6, 2020), the number of days above 25°C ranges from 0-10 days throughout much of Alberta and into the BC Peace then extends up to 51-60 days in southern Manitoba (Fig. 10).

Figure 9. Highest temperatures (°C) observed across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (April 1-August 3, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (06Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209
Figure 10. Number of days above 25 °C observed across the Canadian prairies this growing season (April 1-August 5, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (06Aug2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. Growers can bookmark the AAFC Current Conditions Drought Watch Maps for the growing season. Historical weather data can be access at the AAFC Drought Watch website, Environment Canada’s Historical Data website, or your provincial weather network.

Weather synopsis

An abbreviated synopsis of the past week is provided below. Recent warm weather across the Canadian prairies helped crop development this past week

The growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5 ºC, April 1-July 27, 2020) is below (Fig. 1) while the growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10 ºC, April 1-July 27, 2020) is shown in Figure 2.

Figure 1. Growing degree day map (Base 5 °C) observed across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-July 27, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (30Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209
Figure 2. Growing degree day map (Base 10 °C) observed across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-July 27, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (30Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The highest temperatures (°C) observed across the Canadian prairies the past seven days ranged from <22 to >34 °C (Fig. 3). So far this growing season (up to July 29, 2020), the number of days above 25 ranges from 0-10 days throughout much of Alberta and into the BC Peace then extends up to 41-50 days in southern Manitoba (Fig. 4).

Figure 3. Highest temperatures (°C) observed across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (April 1-July 29, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (30Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209
Figure 4. Number of days above 25 °C observed across the Canadian prairies this growing season (April 1-July 29, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (30Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

Cumulative rainfall for the past 7 days was lowest across southern regions of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba with the exception of around Regina south to the American border, and southwest Manitoba west into the southeast corner of Saskatchewan (Fig. 5). Cumulative 30-day (Fig. 6) and rainfall for the growing season (April 1-July 29, 2020; Fig. 7) are below.

Figure 5. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (as of July 29, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (30Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209
Figure 6. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past 30 days (as of July 29, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (30Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209
Figure 7. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (as of July 29, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (30Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. Growers can bookmark the AAFC Current Conditions Drought Watch Maps for the growing season. Historical weather data can be access at the AAFC Drought Watch website, Environment Canada’s Historical Data website, or your provincial weather network.

Weather synopsis

This past week (July 13-19, 2020) prairie temperatures were warmest in Manitoba and eastern Saskatchewan (Table 1; Fig. 1). Average 7-day temperatures continue to be warmest across Manitoba and eastern Saskatchewan and coolest across most of Alberta(Table 1; Fig. 1).

Figure 1. Observed average temperatures across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (July 13-19, 2020).

Average 30-day (June 20-July 19, 2020) temperatures continued to be cooler in Alberta than eastern Saskatchewan and Manitoba (Table 2; Fig. 2). The average 30-day temperature at Winnipeg and Brandon continued to be greater than locations in Alberta and Saskatchewan(Table 2; Fig. 2). Based on growing season temperatures (April 1 – July 19, 2020), conditions continue to be warmest for southern locations (Table 3).

Figure 2. Observed average temperatures across the Canadian prairies the past 30 days (June 20-July 19, 2020).

Cumulative rainfall for the past 7 days was lowest across southern regions of Alberta and Saskatchewan. Cumulative 30-day rainfall was lowest across a large area ranging from southwest Saskatchewan to Saskatoon. Growing season rainfall (percent of average) is below normal across eastern Saskatchewan and localized areas of Manitoba.

Figure 4. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (July 16-19, 2020).
Figure 5. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past 30 days (June 20-July 19, 2020).
Figure 6. Percent of average precipitation for the growing season (April 1-July 19, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (21Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5 ºC, April 1-July 13, 2020) is below (Fig. 7) while the growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10 ºC, April 1-July 13, 2020) is shown in Figure 8.

Figure 7. Growing degree day map (Base 5 °C) observed across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-July 22, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (23Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209
Figure 8. Growing degree day map (Base 10 °C) observed across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-July 22, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (23Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The highest temperatures (°C) observed across the Canadian prairies the past seven days ranged from <19 to >32 °C (Fig. 9). So far this growing season (up to July 22, 2020), the number of days above 25 ranges from 0-10 days throughout much of Alberta and into the BC Peace then extends up to 41-50 days in southern Manitoba (Fig. 10).

Figure 9. Highest temperatures (°C) observed across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (April 1-July 19, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (23Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209
Figure 10. Number of days above 25 °C observed across the Canadian prairies this growing season (April 1-July 22, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (23Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. Growers can bookmark the AAFC Current Conditions Drought Watch Maps for the growing season. Historical weather data can be access at the AAFC Drought Watch website, Environment Canada’s Historical Data website, or your provincial weather network.

Weather synopsis

The 2020 growing season, April 1 – July 12, 2020, has been cooler and wetter than normal across many locations in Alberta and Saskatchewan. Conditions in Manitoba have been warmer and dryer than normal. This past week (July 6-12, 2020) prairie temperatures were warmest in Manitoba and eastern Saskatchewan (Table 1; Fig. 1). Average 7-day temperatures continue to be warmest across Manitoba and eastern Saskatchewan and coolest across most of Alberta (Table 1; Fig. 1).

Figure 1. Observed average temperatures across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (July 6-12, 2020).

Average 30-day (June 13-July 12, 2020) temperatures continue to be cooler in Alberta than in southern Saskatchewan and Manitoba (Table 2; Fig. 2). The average 30-day temperature at Winnipeg and Brandon continued to be greater than locations in Alberta and Saskatchewan (Fig. 2). Temperature anomalies indicate that temperatures have been below normal across most of Alberta and Saskatchewan and were 0 to 2 °C warmer than average across eastern Saskatchewan and southern Manitoba (Table 2; Fig. 3). Based on growing season temperatures (April 1 – July 12, 2020), conditions have been warmest for southern locations (Table 3).

Figure 2. Observed average temperatures across the Canadian prairies the past 30 days (June 13-July 12, 2020).
Figure 3. Mean temperature difference from Normal the past 30 days (June 16-July 13, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (13Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

Cumulative rainfall for the past 7 days was lowest across southern regions of Alberta and across most of Manitoba (Table 1 Fig. 4). Lethbridge reported 4.2 mm and Winnipeg reported 1.4 mm (Table 1). Cumulative 30 day rainfall continued to be greatest across central regions of Alberta (Table 2; Fig. 5). Rainfall amounts were lowest across southern regions of the prairies (Table 2; Fig. 5).

Figure 4. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (July 6-12, 2020).

Total 30-day rainfall at Brandon, Winnipeg and Swift Current was less than 100 mm (Table 2; Fig. 5). Lethbridge has reported 122.3 mm (261% of normal) in the past 30 days (Table 2). Growing season rainfall (percent of average) is below normal across eastern Saskatchewan and localized areas of Manitoba.

Figure 5. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past 30 days (June 13-July 12, 2020).
Figure 6. Percent of average precipitation for the growing season (April 1-July 13, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (14Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5 ºC, April 1-July 13, 2020) is below (Fig. 7):

Figure 7. Growing degree day map (Base 5 °C) observed across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-July 13, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (16Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10 ºC, April 1-July 13, 2020) is below (Fig. 8):

Figure 8. Growing degree day map (Base 10 °C) observed across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-July 13, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (16Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The highest temperatures (°C) observed the past seven days ranged from <15 to >33 °C in the map below (Fig. 9).

Figure 9. Highest temperatures (°C) observed across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (April 1-July 13, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (16Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. Growers can bookmark the AAFC Current Conditions Drought Watch Maps for the growing season. Historical weather data can be access at the AAFC Drought Watch website, Environment Canada’s Historical Data website, or your provincial weather network.

Weather synopsis

This week, June 29-July 5, 2020, prairie temperatures were warmest in Manitoba and eastern Saskatchewan and seven day cumulative rainfall varied across the prairies (Table 1). Average 7-day temperatures continue to be warmest across Manitoba and eastern Saskatchewan and coolest across most of Alberta (Fig. 1). The weekly average temperature at Winnipeg (24.5 °C) was 6.6 °C warmer than the long term average value and was 10.9 °C warmer than the 7-day observed temperature at Grande Prairie (Table 1; Fig. 1). The average weekly temperature for Lethbridge was 13.8 °C and 2.3 °C cooler than normal (Table 1).

Figure 1. Observed average temperatures across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (June 29-July 5, 2020).

Average 30-day (June 6-July 5, 2020) temperatures continue to be cooler in Alberta than southern Saskatchewan and Manitoba (Table 2). The average 30-day temperature at Winnipeg and Brandon continued to be greater than locations in Alberta and Saskatchewan (Table 2; Fig. 2). June temperature anomalies indicate that temperatures have been below normal across most of Alberta and Saskatchewan and were 0 to 2 °C warmer than average across southeastern Saskatchewan and southern Manitoba (Table 2; Fig. 3). Based on growing season temperatures (April 1 – July 5, 2020), conditions were warmest for southern locations (Table 3).

Figure 2. Observed average temperatures across the Canadian prairies the past 30 days (June 6-July 5, 2020).
Figure 3. Mean temperature difference from Normal for the month of June 2020.
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (05Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

Cumulative rainfall for the past 7 days was lowest across western regions of Saskatchewan (Table 1; Fig. 4). Lethbridge reported 69.4 mm. Cumulative 30-day rainfall continued to be greatest across central regions of Alberta (Table 2; Fig. 5). Rainfall amounts were lowest across the most of Saskatchewan.

Figure 4. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (June 29-July 5, 2020).

Total 30-day rainfall at Saskatoon, Lethbridge, Lacombe and Grande Prairie exceeded 100 mm (Table 2; Fig. 5). Saskatoon has reported 156.6 mm (277% of normal) in the past 30 days (Table 2). Growing season rainfall (percent of average) is below normal southern Saskatchewan and most of Manitoba. Rainfall amounts are above average across central regions of Saskatchewan and across Alberta.

Figure 5. Observed cumulative precipitation across the Canadian prairies the past 30 days (June 6-July 5, 2020).
Figure 6. Percent of average precipitation for the growing season (April 1-July 5, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (05Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5 ºC, April 1-July 6, 2020) is below (Fig. 7):

Figure 7. Growing degree day map (Base 5 °C) observed across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-July 6, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (09Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The highest temperatures (°C) observed the past seven days ranged from <15 to >33 °C in the map below (Fig. 8).

Figure 8. Highest temperatures (°C) observed across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (April 1-July 8, 2020).
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (09Jul2020). Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true&reset=1588297059209

The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. Growers can bookmark the AAFC Current Conditions Drought Watch Maps for the growing season. Historical weather data can be access at the AAFC Drought Watch website, Environment Canada’s Historical Data website, or your provincial weather network.

Wind trajectories

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) have been working together to study the potential of trajectories for monitoring insect movements since the late 1990s.

The entire list of 2020 Wind Trajectory Reports is available here.

→ Read the WEEKLY Wind Trajectory Report for Wk10 (released June 22, 2020).

Wind Trajectories

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) have been working together to study the potential of trajectories for monitoring insect movements since the late 1990s.

The entire list of 2020 Wind Trajectory Reports is available here.

→ Read the WEEKLY Wind Trajectory Report for Wk08 (released June 15, 2020).

Wind trajectories

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) have been working together to study the potential of trajectories for monitoring insect movements since the late 1990s.

The entire list of 2020 Wind Trajectory Reports is available here.

→ Read the WEEKLY Wind Trajectory Report for Wk07 (released June 8, 2020).

Wind trajectories

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) have been working together to study the potential of trajectories for monitoring insect movements since the late 1990s.

The entire list of 2020 Wind Trajectory Reports is available here.

→ Read the WEEKLY Wind Trajectory Report for Wk06 (released June 1, 2020).

Wind trajectories

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) have been working together to study the potential of trajectories for monitoring insect movements since the late 1990s.

The entire list of 2020 Wind Trajectory Reports is available here.

→ Read the WEEKLY Wind Trajectory Report for Wk05 (released May 25, 2020).

Wind trajectories

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) have been working together to study the potential of trajectories for monitoring insect movements since the late 1990s.

The entire list of 2020 Wind Trajectory Reports is available here.

→ Read the WEEKLY Wind Trajectory Report for Wk04 (released May 18, 2020).

→ Read the DAILY Wind Trjectory Reports for Wk04 (released May 20 and May 21).

Wind trajectories

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) have been working together to study the potential of trajectories for monitoring insect movements since the late 1990s.

Access the 2020 Wind Trajectory Reportsfor the first WEEKLY REPORT (11 May 2020).

New – Review the DAILY REPORT (released 15May2020).

Wind trajectories

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) have been working together to study the potential of trajectories for monitoring insect movements since the late 1990s.

Find the first WEEKLY report (available 11 May 2020).

Wind trajectories

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) have been working together to study the potential of trajectories for monitoring insect movements since the late 1990s.

Data not available this week.

Weather synopsis

Temperatures this week, June 18-24, 2019, were similar to last week. Over the past seven days temperatures were cooler than normal. The warmest temperatures were observed across MB while temperatures were cooler in western SK and across AB (Fig. 1). The is a complete reversal to last week.  

Figure 1. Average temperature (°C) across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (June 16-24 2019).

Average 30 day temperatures were warmest across southern MB and SK (Fig. 2). Cooler temperatures were reported across eastern and northern AB. The mean temperature differences from normal (May 21 – June 17, 2019) have been zero to two °C warmer than normal for AB and SK while temperatures in MB have been zero to two °C cooler than normal (Fig. 3). 

Figure 2. Average temperature (°C) across the Canadian prairies the past 30 days (May 26-June 24 2019).
Figure 3. Mean temperature difference from Normal across the Canadian prairies over the past 30 days (to June 17, 2019).  
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (25Jun2019).  Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true

Growing season temperatures (April 1-June 24, 2019) have been warmest across the southern prairies (Fig. 4). The warmest growing season temperatures have been reported for southern AB and an area south of Winnipeg MB. Across the prairies, the average growing season temperature has been 1.2 °C below normal.

Figure 4. Average temperature (°C) across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-June 24 2019).

This past week significant rainfall amounts were reported for most of SK and across central  regions of AB (Fig. 5). Across the prairies, rainfall amounts for the past 30 days (May 26 – June 24, 2019) have been near normal (Fig. 6). The Edmonton region has been the wettest. 

Figure 5. Cumulative precipitation observed the past seven days across the Canadian prairies (June 18-24 2019).
Figure 6. Cumulative precipitation observed the past 30 days across the Canadian prairies (May 26-June 24, 2019).
Figure 7. Cumulative precipitation observed for the growing season (April 1-June 24, 2019) across the Canadian prairies.
Figure 8. Modeled soil moisture (%) across the Canadian prairies as of June 24, 2019.

The growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 5 ºC, April 1-June 24, 2019) is below (Fig. 9):

Figure 9. Growing degree day (Base 5 ºC) across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-June 24 2019).  
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (25Jun2019).  Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true

The growing degree day map (GDD) (Base 10 ºC, April 1-June 24, 2019) is below (Fig. 10):

Figure 10. Growing degree day (Base 10 ºC) across the Canadian prairies for the growing season (April 1-June 24, 2019).Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (25Jun2019).  Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true

The lowest temperatures (°C) observed the past seven days ranged from about 11 to 0 °C in the map below (Fig. 11).

Figure 11. Lowest temperatures (°C) observed across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (to June 24, 2019).  
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (25Jun2019).  Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true

The highest temperatures (°C) observed the past seven days ranged from about 16 to at least 27 °C in the map below (Fig. 12).

Figure 12. Highest temperatures (°C) observed across the Canadian prairies the past seven days (to June 24, 2019).  
Image has not been reproduced in affiliation with, or with the endorsement of the Government of Canada and was retrieved (24Jun2019).  Access the full map at http://www.agr.gc.ca/DW-GS/current-actuelles.jspx?lang=eng&jsEnabled=true

The maps above are all produced by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.  Growers can bookmark the AAFC Drought Watch Maps for the growing season.

Wind Trajectories

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) have been working together to study the potential of trajectories for monitoring insect movements since the late 1990’s.

In a continuing effort to produce timely information, the wind trajectory reports are available in two forms:

Wind Trajectories

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) have been working together to study the potential of trajectories for monitoring insect movements since the late 1990s.

In a continuing effort to produce timely information, the wind trajectory reports are available in two forms:

Wind Trajectories

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) have been working together to study the potential of trajectories for monitoring insect movements since the late 1990s.

In a continuing effort to produce timely information, the wind trajectory reports are available in two forms:

Wind Trajectories

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) have been working together to study the potential of trajectories for monitoring insect movements since the late 1990s.

In a continuing effort to produce timely information, the wind trajectory reports are available in two forms:

Wind Trajectories

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) have been working together to study the potential of trajectories for monitoring insect movements since the late 1990s.

In a continuing effort to produce timely information, the wind trajectory reports are available in two forms:

Wind Trajectories

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) have been working together to study the potential of trajectories for monitoring insect movements since the late 1990s.

In a continuing effort to produce timely information, the wind trajectory reports are available in two forms:

Wind Trajectories

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) have been working together to study the potential of trajectories for monitoring insect movements since the late 1990s.

In a continuing effort to produce timely information, the wind trajectory reports are available in two forms:

Wind Trajectories

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) have been working together to study the potential of trajectories for monitoring insect movements since the late 1990s.

In a continuing effort to produce timely information, the wind trajectory reports are available in two forms:

Wind trajectories

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) have been working together to study the potential of trajectories for monitoring insect movements since the late 1990s. Trajectory models are used to deliver an early-warning system for the origin and destination of migratory invasive species, such as diamondback moth.  In addition, plant pathologists have shown that trajectories can assist with the prediction of plant disease infestations and are also beginning to utilize these same data. We receive two types of model output from ECCC: reverse trajectories and forward trajectories.

‘Reverse trajectories’ (RT) refer to air currents that are tracked back in time from specified Canadian locations over a five-day period prior to their arrival date.  Of particular interest are those trajectories that, prior to their arrival in Canada, originated over northwestern and southern USA and Mexico, anywhere diamondback moth populations overwinter and adults are actively migrating.  If diamondback adults are present in the air currents that originate from these southern locations, the moths may be deposited on the Prairies at sites along the trajectory, depending on the local weather conditions at the time that the trajectories pass over our area (e.g. rain showers, etc.). Reverse trajectories are the best available estimate of the ”true” 3D wind fields at a specific point. They are based on observations, satellite and radiosonde data.

‘Forward trajectories’ (FT) have a similar purpose; however, the modelling process begins at sites in USA & Mexico. The model output predicts the pathway of a trajectory. Again, of interest to us are the winds that eventually end up passing over the Prairies.

Ross Weiss (AAFC), Meghan Vankosky (AAFC) and Serge Trudel (ECCC)

DATE: APRIL 30, 2019

1. Reverse trajectories (RT)

a.  Pacific Northwest (PNW) – For the period of April 24-30 there have been 18 RTs (originating over ID, OR and WA) that have crossed over prairie locations.  By comparison, for the period of April  17-23 there were 51 RT’s. The majority PNW RTs have been reported to pass over southern AB.  Since March 23rd  Lethbridge AB has reported the highest number of PNW RTs (n=22), Beiseker AB  (n=15) and Olds AB (n=31).

Figure 1.  Daily total number of reverse trajectories (RTs) originating over Idaho, Oregon, and Washington that have crossed the Canadian prairies as of April 30, 2019.
Figure 2.  Total number of dates with PNW reverse trajectories originating over Idaho, Oregon, and Washington that have crossed the Canadian prairies (since March 23, 2019).
Figure 3.  List of PNW (Idaho, Oregon, and Washington) reverse trajectories that have crossed the prairies (since March 23, 2019).

b.  Mexico and SW USA (TX, CA) – No trajectories, originating over Mexico or southwest USA have crossed the prairies for the period of April 24-30, 2019. Since March 23, 2019 there have been 5 reverse trajectories that originated over Mexico, CA and TX. All five occurred on April 7.

c.  Texas and Oklahoma – No trajectories, originating over TX or OK have crossed the prairies for the period of April 24-30, 2019.  Since March 23, 2019 there have been 18 reverse trajectories that have originated over OK and TX. Most of these trajectories have crossed eastern SK and MB.

2.  Forward trajectories (FT) – 

The following table reports the origin of forward trajectories predicted to cross the prairies over the next five days (Note: ‘InitialDate’ refers to when the forward trajectory crossed the source location. Trajectories are predicted to cross prairie locations within five days of the initial date).  

In a continuing effort to produce timely information, wind trajectory reports will be available both DAILY and WEEKLY:

Weather forecasts (7 day):

Wind Trajectories

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) have been working together to study the potential of trajectories for monitoring insect movements since the late 1990s. Trajectory models are used to deliver an early-warning system for the origin and destination of migratory invasive species, such as diamondback moth.  In addition, plant pathologists have shown that trajectories can assist with the prediction of plant disease infestations and are also beginning to utilize these same data. We receive two types of model output from ECCC: reverse trajectories and forward trajectories.

‘Reverse trajectories’ (RT) refer to air currents that are tracked back in time from specified Canadian locations over a five-day period prior to their arrival date.  Of particular interest are those trajectories that, prior to their arrival in Canada, originated over northwestern and southern USA and Mexico, anywhere diamondback moth populations overwinter and adults are actively migrating.  If diamondback adults are present in the air currents that originate from these southern locations, the moths may be deposited on the Prairies at sites along the trajectory, depending on the local weather conditions at the time that the trajectories pass over our area (e.g. rain showers, etc.). Reverse trajectories are the best available estimate of the ”true” 3D wind fields at a specific point. They are based on observations, satellite and radiosonde data.

‘Forward trajectories’ (FT) have a similar purpose; however, the modelling process begins at sites in USA & Mexico. The model output predicts the pathway of a trajectory. Again, of interest to us are the winds that eventually end up passing over the Prairies.

Ross Weiss (AAFC), Meghan Vankosky (AAFC) and Serge Trudel (ECCC)

DATE: APRIL 24, 2019

Reverse trajectories (RT)

a. Pacific Northwest (PNW) – For the period of April 17-23, 2019, there have been 55 RT’s (originating over ID, OR and WA) that have crossed over prairie locations (Figs. 1 and 2).  By comparison, for the period of April  10-16, 2019, there were 31 RT’s. The majority PNW RT’s have been reported to pass over southern AB.  Since March 23rd, Lethbridge AB has reported the highest number of PNW RT’s (n=20), Beiseker AB  (n=15) and Gainsborough SK (n=11).

Figure 1.  Daily total number of reverse trajectories originating over ID, OR, and WA that have crossed the prairies.
Figure 2. Total number of dates with PNW reverse trajectories originating over ID, OR, and WA that have crossed the prairies (since March 23, 2019).

b. Mexico and SW USA (TX, CA) – No trajectories, originating over Mexico or southwest USA have crossed the prairies for the period of April 17-23, 2019. Since March 23, 2019 there have been 5 reverse trajectories that originated over Mexico, CA and TX. All five occurred on April 7, 2019.

c. Texas and Oklahoma – No trajectories, originating over TX or OK have crossed the prairies for the period of April 17-23, 2019.  Since March 23, 2019 there have been 18 reverse trajectories that have originated over OK and TX (Fig. 3). Most of these trajectories have crossed eastern SK and MB.

Figure 3.  Total number of dates with reverse trajectories originating over OK and TX that have crossed the prairies (since March 23, 2019).

d. Nebraska and Kansas – No trajectories, originating over KS or NE have crossed the prairies for the period of April 17-23, 2019.  Since March 23, 2019 there have been 18 reverse trajectories that have originated over KS and NE (Fig. 4).

Figure 4. Total number of dates with reverse trajectories originating over KS and NE that have crossed the prairies (since March 23, 2019).

In a continuing effort to produce timely information, wind trajectory reports will be available both DAILY and WEEKLY:

Wind Trajectories

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) have been working together to study the potential of trajectories for monitoring insect movements since the late 1990s.

In a continuing effort to produce timely information, the wind trajectory reports will be available both DAILY and WEEKLY:

Wind Trajectories

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) have been working together to study the potential of trajectories for monitoring insect movements since the late 1990s. Trajectory models are used to deliver an early-warning system for the origin and destination of migratory invasive species, such as diamondback moth.  In addition, plant pathologists have shown that trajectories can assist with the prediction of plant disease infestations and are also beginning to utilize these same data. We receive two types of model output from ECCC: reverse trajectories and forward trajectories.

‘Reverse trajectories’ (RT) refer to air currents that are tracked back in time from specified Canadian locations over a five-day period prior to their arrival date.  Of particular interest are those trajectories that, prior to their arrival in Canada, originated over northwestern and southern USA and Mexico, anywhere diamondback moth populations overwinter and adults are actively migrating.  If diamondback adults are present in the air currents that originate from these southern locations, the moths may be deposited on the Prairies at sites along the trajectory, depending on the local weather conditions at the time that the trajectories pass over our area (e.g. rain showers, etc.). Reverse trajectories are the best available estimate of the ”true” 3D wind fields at a specific point. They are based on observations, satellite and radiosonde data.

‘Forward trajectories’ (FT) have a similar purpose; however, the modelling process begins at sites in USA & Mexico. The model output predicts the pathway of a trajectory. Again, of interest to us are the winds that eventually end up passing over the Prairies.

Ross Weiss (AAFC), Meghan Vankosky (AAFC) and Serge Trudel (ECCC)

DATE: APRIL 8, 2019

1.  Reverse trajectories (RT):
a.  Pacific Northwest (PNW) – For the period of April 2-8 there have been 69 RT’s (originating over the PNW) that have crossed over prairie locations.  Since March 23rd  Lethbridge has reported the highest number of PNW RT’s (n=9), followed by Olds AB, Beiseker AB and Dauphin MB (n=6).

List of PNW Reverse trajectories that have crossed the prairies (Since March 23, 2019):

b.  Mexico and SW USA (SW) – On April 7 the first Southwestern USA and Mexico RT’s crossed the prairies. These reverse trajectories originated over TX and CA.

The following maps present two examples of April 7, 2019 RT’s. The first map indicates that the RT crossing Tisdale originated across southern TX. The second map shows that two RT’s crossed over Regina. The red line indicates that this RT originated over southern TX. A second RT originated across central CA.

Tisdale SK, April 7, 2019

Regina SK, April 7, 2019

2.  Forward trajectories (FT) – 

The following table reports the origin of forward trajectories predicted to cross the prairies over the next five days.  Forward trajectories, originating over Santa Maria, CA are predicted to pass over SK and MB in the next five days.