Pea Leaf Weevil in Central Alberta

Jennifer Otani
Categories
Week 4

Previous reports and surveys performed by Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development’s Meers and Barkley confirmed the presence of Pea leaf weevil (Sitona lineatus) in the Red Deer region recently.

This week, faba bean plots at AAFC-Lacombe were observed to have suffered feeding damage from this introduced weevil species (note notching of leaves in photos below).  The damage was characterized by P. Reid as <10% foliage consumed which isn’t expected to affect yield according to H. Carcamo (AAFC-Lethbridge) who also posited that faba beans may tolerate more PLW feeding damage than peas owing to the fact that they produce more nodules and are recognized as the best nitrogen-fixing pulse crop.

***See Insect of the Week from June 1 for more information (description, damage, management options, etc) on the pea leaf weevil from the new Field Crop and Forage pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada***

Wind Trajectories

Ross Weiss, Owen Olfert, Serge Trudel and prairiepest_admin
Categories
Week 4
Wind trajectories Related to Diamondback Moth (DBM) and Aster Leafhopper
Introductions to the Canadian Prairies in 2015

BACKGROUND:
  Potential wind events capable of carrying insect pests
from source areas in the USA can be identified by following trajectories for
air parcels through time. 
High altitude air masses, originating
from southern locations, frequently move northerly to Canadian destinations.
Insect pest species such as Diamondback moth and Aster leafhoppers,
traditionally unable to overwinter above the 49th parallel, can utilize these
air masses in the spring to move north from Mexico and the United States
(southern or Pacific northwest).
Wind trajectory data processing by AAFC-Saskatoon Staff (Weiss &
Olfert) began in April.  Reverse Trajectories track air
masses arriving across the prairies back to their point of origin.  Forward
Trajectories
 predict favorable winds expected to arrive
across the Canadian Prairies.  
Updated: May 23-25, 2015
1.  Reverse trajectories (RT)
This week, RTs are originating over the Arctic, tracking south to pass
over South and North Dakota and tracking north into the Canadian prairies.
2.  Forward trajectories (FT) 
This week, Environment Canada models project that FTs crossing the
prairies are expected to originate from the following sites:
Location
Projected
Arrival Dates
BOZEMAN_MONTANA
25/05/2015
EASTERN_WASHINGTON
25/05/2015
MOSCOW_IDAHO
25/05/2015
EASTERN_WASHINGTON
24/05/2015
MANHATTAN_KANSAS
24/05/2015
MOSCOW_IDAHO
24/05/2015
BROWNSVILLE_TEXAS
23/05/2015
EASTERN_WASHINGTON
23/05/2015
MOSCOW_IDAHO
23/05/2015

Insect of the Week – Diamondback moth

Jennifer Otani
Categories
Week 4

In follow-up to Scott Hartley’s observations, this week’s Insect of the Week highlights diamondback moth (from the new Field Crop and Forage Pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada – Identification and Management Field Guide). See also Insect of the Week from May 11 for flea beetle description, scouting and management options.


SHARE THIS POST