Saskatchewan Field Notes

Scott Hartley and prairiepest_admin
Categories
Week 3

Thanks to Scott Hartley for forwarding these quick observations….


Flea beetles:  On Thursday received a report of intense flea beetle
feeding on a young crop at cotyledon stage.  It was reported as striped
flea beetles in high numbers with plenty of stem girdling – very damaging for a
seedling crop.  They are considering re-seeding some of the (substantial)
acres affected. 



Diamondback moths (DBM):  So far, no
significant numbers of DBM picked up in pheromone traps reporting from Saskatchewan.


Wind Trajectories

Ross Weiss, Owen Olfert, Serge Trudel and prairiepest_admin
Categories
Week 3
Wind trajectories Related to
Diamondback Moth (DBM) and Aster Leafhopper Introductions to the Canadian
Prairies in 2015

BACKGROUND:
  Potential wind events
capable of carrying insect pests from source areas in the USA can be identified
by following trajectories for air parcels through time. 
High altitude air masses, originating from southern locations,
frequently move northerly to Canadian destinations. Insect pest species such as
Diamondback moth and Aster leafhoppers, traditionally unable to overwinter
above the 49th parallel, can utilize these air masses in the spring to move
north from Mexico and the United States (southern or Pacific northwest).
Wind trajectory data processing by
AAFC-Saskatoon Staff (Weiss & Olfert) began in April.  Reverse
Trajectories
 track air masses arriving across the prairies back to
their point of origin.  Forward Trajectories predict favorable winds expected to arrive across the Canadian Prairies.  
Updated: May 20, 2015
1. 
Reverse trajectories (RT)
During the early part of May, reverse
trajectories (RTs) were originating over the Arctic, but have recently shifted
southward.  This week a number of RTs, originating from California, Texas
and Mexico have passed over a number of prairie locations. The following table provides
an overview of were RTs originating across southwest USA and Mexico have
crossed the prairies.
Number
of Dates Reverse Trajectories Were Tracked to these Prairie Sites (between
May 13-20, 2015)
Location
Latitude
Longitude
Number
of Dates
BRANDON_MB
49.8
-99.9
3
SELKIRK_MB
50.1
-96.9
3
YORKTON_SK
51.2
-102.4
2
RUSSELL_MB
50.8
-101.3
2
CARMAN_MB
49.5
-98
2
GRENFELL_SK
50.4
-102.9
2
PORTAGE_MB
50
-98.3
2
LETHBRIDGE_AB
49.7
-112.8
1
KINDERSLEY_SK
51.5
-109.1
1
DAUPHIN_MB
51.1
-100
1
GAINSBOROUGH_SK
49.2
-101.4
1
PROVOST_AB
52.4
-110.3
1
2.  Forward trajectories (FT)
Environment Canada models indicate that
most of the forward trajectories crossing the prairies are expected to
originate over northwestern USA (Pacific).

Insect of the week – Aster and potato leafhoppers

Jennifer Otani
Categories
Week 3

See this week’s Insect of the Week for descriptions and pictures of the aster and potato leafhoppers (Macrosteles quadrilineatus and Empoasca fabae) from the new Field Crop and Forage Pests and their Natural Enemies in Western Canada – Identification and Management Field Guide

Ongoing Monitoring Efforts for 2015

Owen Olfert, Jennifer Otani, Ross Weiss, David Giffen and Erl Svendsen
Categories
Week 3

In 2014, the PPMN compiled data for the following sites highlighted in the map below.  The monitoring data collected from these sites forms invaluable sources of information both now and into the future.

Agricultural people from federal, provincial, regional and industry sectors all contribute to this tremendous effort!  Monitoring at sites like these below provides crucial information on insect pest risk before and during the growing season.  Some sites are visited annually while others are checked weekly and all that data enables the synthesis and generation of risk and forecast maps like those posted here.

THANK YOU to all who contribute!
Please contact Dr. Owen Olfert at AAFC-Saskatoon for more information about this map.

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